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Hemodynamic effects of ketamine in children with congenital heart disease and/or pulmonary hypertension

Rohit S. Loomba1, Seth B. Gray2, Saul Flores3

1 Department of Pediatrics, The Heart Institute, Advocate Children’s Hospital, Oak Lawn, Illinois
2 Department of Pediatrics, Division of Cardiology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
3 Department of Pediatrics, Section of Critical Care and Cardiology, Texas Children’s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas

* Corresponding Author: Rohit S. Loomba, Cardiac Intensive Care Unit, The Heart Institute, Advocate Children’s Hospital, Oak Lawn, IL. Email: email

Congenital Heart Disease 2018, 13(5), 646-654. https://doi.org/10.1111/chd.12662

Abstract

Introduction: Ketamine is a drug often used for procedural sedation or as adjunct agent for general sedation in children with congenital heart disease. In the clinical realm, there is often confusion regarding the effects of ketamine on hemodynamics, particularly pulmonary vascular resistance and systemic vascular resistance. We per‐ formed a meta‐analysis of studies investigating the effects of ketamine on hemodynamics.
Methods: A systematic review was conducted to identify studies characterizing the hemodynamic effects of ketamine in children with congenital heart disease. Studies were assessed for quality and those of satisfactory quality with pre‐ and postketa‐ mine hemodynamics for each patient were included in the final analyses. Those not limited to pediatric patients and those not limited to patients with congenital heart disease were excluded from the final analyses.
Results: A total of 7 studies with 139 patients were included in the final analyses. Pulmonary vascular resistance, systemic vascular resistance, mean pulmonary artery pressure, mean systemic pressure, heart rate, pH, and arterial oxygen concentration did not significantly change with administration of ketamine. Carbon dioxide concen‐ tration did increase significantly by a mean of 1.38 mm Hg with the administration of ketamine.
Conclusion: Ketamine has minimal impact on hemodynamics in children with con‐ genital heart disease when used at usual clinical doses. Systemic vascular resistance and pulmonary vascular resistance are not significantly altered. Blood gas values are also only minimally affected by ketamine.

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Cite This Article

Loomba, R. S., Gray, S. B., Flores, S. (2018). Hemodynamic effects of ketamine in children with congenital heart disease and/or pulmonary hypertension. Congenital Heart Disease, 13(5), 646–654.



cc This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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