Vol.6, No.3, 2018, pp.219-225, doi:10.7569/JRM.2017.634161
OPEN ACCESS
ARTICLE
Application of Amine-Functionalized Cellulose Foam for CO2 Capture and Storage in the Brewing Industry
  • Lars Helmlinger1, Yejun Zhu1, Julia Gensel1, Thomas Neumeyer1, Stefan Thäter2, Franziska Strube2, Christoph Bauer2, Bernd Rosemann2, Volker Altstädt1*
Neue Materialien Bayreuth GmbH, Gottlieb-Keim-Straße 60, 95448 Bayreuth, Germany
Chair for Environmentally Friendly Production Technology, Universitätsstraße 30, 95447 Bayreuth, Germany
*Corresponding author: Volker.Altstaedt@nmbgmbh.de
Abstract
Due to a lack of technology, smaller breweries simply dump excess CO2 into the atmosphere, fueling the greenhouse effect and global warming. State-of-the-art CO2 capture technologies using nanofibrillated cellulose are expensive and require laborious freeze-drying. Consequently, there is a high demand for affordable alternatives in order to reduce the environmental impact in this industry sector. This work describes a novel route for a quick and cost-efficient synthesis of amine-functionalized cellulose pellets by a surfactant-assisted steam explosion process. Typical values with this method were porosity of 92% and density of 67 g/cm³. Investigations on polyethylenimine (PEI) content and distribution revealed a maximum PEI concentration of 20 wt% with decreasing concentration to the core of a pellet. Sufficient stability against brewery exhaust gas was determined and CO2 release at ~ 120 °C could be confirmed. Capacity tests under simulated working conditions with a novel laboratory reactor yielded a CO2 capacity of 1.0 mmol/g or 67 mol/m³, which is comparable to values known from the literature for other cellulose-based adsorbents.
Keywords
CO2 capture, carbon capture, poly(ethylenimine), cellulose, adsorption
Cite This Article
Helmlinger, L., Zhu, Y., Gensel, J., Neumeyer, T., Thäter, S. et al. (2018). Application of Amine-Functionalized Cellulose Foam for CO2 Capture and Storage in the Brewing Industry. Journal of Renewable Materials, 6(3), 219–225.