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Prevalence and Factors Associated with Depression, Anxiety and Stress in IBD Patients Undergoing Intravenous Biological Therapy during the COVID-19 Pandemic-Montenegro Experience

Brigita Smolović1,2, Marija Đurović1, Miloš Lukić1, Marija Abramović2,3, Damir Muhović1,2,*

1 Department of Gastroenterohepatology, Clinic for Internal Medicine, Clinical Center of Montenegro, Podgorica, 81000, Montenegro
2 Faculty of Medicine, University of Montenegro, Podgorica, 81000, Montenegro
3 Clinic of Radiology, Clinical Center of Montenegro, Podgorica, 81000, Montenegro

* Corresponding Author: Damir Muhović. Email: email

International Journal of Mental Health Promotion 2022, 24(4), 551-564. https://doi.org/10.32604/ijmhp.2022.020347

Abstract

Throughout its duration, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has been affecting lives worldwide and has had a sizeable impact on mental health, particularly for those who already suffer from a chronic illnesses. Depression, Anxiety and Stress (DAS) are common psychiatric comorbidities in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. This study aims to determine the prevalence and risk factors for moderate and severe symptoms of DAS in IBD patients have been undergoing intravenous biological therapy (IvBTh) during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study was conducted between September 1st and November 30th, 2020 at the Clinical Center of Montenegro-IBD unit, where all patients from Montenegro received the registered IvBTh. This case control study consists of 94 IBD patients that completed a validated questionnaire Depression, Anxiety and Stress Score-21 (DASS-21). A total of 59 patients received tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors (anti-TNF therapy), while 35 received anti-integrin therapy. After we calculated the DASS-21 score, we divided the patients into two groups: those who had moderate and severe symptoms (if they had any of the mentioned DASS-21 subscale score above limit for moderate or more severe symptoms: DASS-21 Depression, higher than 14; DASS-21 Anxiety, higher than 10 and DASS-21 Stress, higher than 19) and those who did not have significant symptoms (DASS-21 subscale score did not exceed the limit). We also examined demographic data, data on IBD characteristics and COVID-19 data and their impact on mental disorders. Standard statistical processing tests were used to identify risk factors for examined mental disorders. Following the DASS-21 criteria, we diagnosed the least moderate depression in 19.1%, anxiety in 14.9% and stress in 20.2% patients. The multivariate analysis indicated there to be a statistically significant relation of being higher at risk of developing depression, anxiety and stress when suffering from an active form of IBD (OR 6.487; 95% Cl 1.220–34.500, P = 0.028). Almost one third (30.9%) of patients have at least one of the examined mental disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic. Particular attention and efforts must be better focused on patients who suffer from an active form of IBD during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

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APA Style
Smolović, B., Đurović, M., Lukić, M., Abramović, M., Muhović, D. (2022). Prevalence and factors associated with depression, anxiety and stress in IBD patients undergoing intravenous biological therapy during the COVID-19 pandemic-montenegro experience. International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, 24(4), 551-564. https://doi.org/10.32604/ijmhp.2022.020347
Vancouver Style
Smolović B, Đurović M, Lukić M, Abramović M, Muhović D. Prevalence and factors associated with depression, anxiety and stress in IBD patients undergoing intravenous biological therapy during the COVID-19 pandemic-montenegro experience. Int J Ment Health Promot. 2022;24(4):551-564 https://doi.org/10.32604/ijmhp.2022.020347
IEEE Style
B. Smolović, M. Đurović, M. Lukić, M. Abramović, and D. Muhović "Prevalence and Factors Associated with Depression, Anxiety and Stress in IBD Patients Undergoing Intravenous Biological Therapy during the COVID-19 Pandemic-Montenegro Experience," Int. J. Ment. Health Promot., vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 551-564. 2022. https://doi.org/10.32604/ijmhp.2022.020347



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