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REVIEW

Review : Uterine mast cells: A new hypothesis to understand how we are born

M. ISOLDE RUDOLPH1, I. GINA ROJAS2, ALICIA B. PENISSI3
1. Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción, Chile.
2. Departamento de Estomatología Quirúrgica, Facultad de Odontología, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción, Chile.
3. Instituto de Histología y Embriología “ Dr. Mario H Burgos” (IHEM-CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Casilla de Correo 56, (5500) Mendoza, Argentina.
Address correspondence to: Dr. M. Isolde Rudolph. Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, 4080831 Concepción, CHILE. E-mail: mrudolph@udec.cl

BIOCELL 2004, 28(1), 1-11. https://doi.org/10.32604/biocell.2004.28.001

Abstract

Birth is the result of complex, well-defined, and coordinated events, that are tightly regulated by endocrine, nervous, and immune responses, and take place primarily in the female reproductive tract. Various mechanisms and mediators involved in pregnancy, labor, and delivery, are highly conserved among different mammalian species and mast cells emerge as potential and crucial participants in these processes, as it is discussed in this review.

Keywords

uterine mast cells, labor, myometrium contractions, cervical ripening

Cite This Article

RUDOLPH, M. I., ROJAS, I. G., PENISSI, A. B. (2004). Review : Uterine mast cells: A new hypothesis to understand how we are born. BIOCELL, 28(1), 1–11.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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