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Modelling the spatial behavior of Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in growing avocado

Maldonado FI1, JF Ramírez2, M Rubí2, X Antonio3, AV Lara4, AD Acosta4, R Rivera4, AL Ávila5
1 Estudiante de Doctorado en Ciencias Agropecuarias y Recursos Naturales de la Facultad de Ciencias Agrícolas de la Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México. Toluca, México. Apartado postal 5020. irita_3@hotmail.com
2 Profesor Investigador de la Facultad de Ciencias Agrícolas de la Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México. Toluca, México. Apartado postal 5020. jframirezd@uaemex.mx, mrubia@uaemex.mx
3 Profesor Investigador de la Facultad de Geografía de la Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México. Toluca, México. Apartado postal 5020. xantonion@uaemex.mx
4 Estudiante de Maestría en Ciencias Agropecuarias y Recursos Naturales de la Facultad de Ciencias Agrícolas de la Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México. Toluca, México. Apartado postal 5020. sakua_02@hotmail.com
5 Estudiante de Licenciatura, Facultad de Ciencias Agrícolas de la Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México. Toluca, México. Apartado postal 5020. beth_liz3@hotmail.com

Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany 2017, 86(all), 97-111. https://doi.org/10.32604/phyton.2017.86.097

Abstract

Avocado (Lauraceae: Persea americana Mill.) is a crop of great economic importance for Mexico in terms of perennial production systems, since in recent years the marketing of this fruit has increased markedly at national and international levels. In 2013, 168113.64 ha were cultivated in Mexico, with an average yield of 10.2 ton/ha, obtaining a production of approximately 1467837.35 ton. Like any other fruit can suffer damage from pests (insects, nematodes, mites etc.) and diseases (caused by fungi, bacteria and viruses). In this regard, one of the most problematic insects is rankliniella occidentalis, which causes significant crop losses, feeding preferably on soft tissues such as leaf buds, flowers, young leaves and developing fruits. The most severe damage, economically speaking, is notorious at first glance, and that it causes ridges or bumps on the pericarp, and these lesions are more apparent as the fruit ripens. The aim of this study was to model the spatial distribution of Frankliniella occidentalis using geostatistical techniques and density maps obtained by kriging. The samplings were carried out fortnightly in three commercial plots of four acres each in the town of Coatepec Harinas, State of Mexico using the method of quadrants. The results indicated that the spatial distribution of populations of F. occidentalis was aggregated in each of the sampling distribution dates; cross-values validation semivariograms corroborated that information, and also a high spatial dependence. The maps obtained allowed to define infested areas and areas free of damage, thus establishing control measures at specific points in each plot to make an efficient use of pesticides.

Keywords

Avocado, Frankliniella occidentalis, Spatial distribution, Coatepec Harinas.

Cite This Article

FI, M., Ramírez, J., Rubí, M., Antonio, X., Lara, A. et al. (2017). Modelling the spatial behavior of Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in growing avocado. Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, 86(all), 97–111.



This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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