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Effects of water deficit on urban forest growth in a dryland South America region

Martinez CF1, FA Roig2, JB Cavagnaro3, MA Cantón1, AM Di Blasi4

Instituto de Ciencias Humanas Sociales y Ambientales INCIHUSA – Centro Científico Tecnológico CCT CONICET Mendoza, Argentina. Av. Ruiz Leal s/n. Parque General San Martín, Mendoza, Argentina. C.P. 5500. Tel. 0054 261-5244310. Fax 0054 261-5244001.
Instituto Argentino de Nivología, Glaciología y Ciencias Ambientales IANIGLA – Centro Científico Tecnológico CCT CONICET Mendoza, Argentina. Av. Ruiz Leal s/n. Parque General San Martín. Ciudad de Mendoza. C.C.131 C.P. 5500. Tel. 0054 261-5244204.
Instituto de Biología Agrícola de Mendoza IBAM. Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias – Universidad Nacional de Cuyo. Alte. Brown 500. Chacras de Coria, Luján de Cuyo, Mendoza. C.P. M5528AHB. Tel.: 0054 261-4135010 (int. 1307). Fax 0054 261 4960460.
Centro Científico Tecnológico CCT CONICET Mendoza, Argentina. Av. Ruiz Leal s/n. Parque General San Martín. Ciudad de Mendoza.C.C.131 C.P. 5500. Tel.: 0054 261-5244029.

* Corresponding Author:Address Correspondence to: Claudia Fernanda Martinez, e-mail: email

Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany 2013, 82(all), 151-160. https://doi.org/10.32604/phyton.2013.82.151

Abstract

Urban forests located in dryland regions of Argentina are sustained mostly by groundwater and water coming from thawing in the Andes. This is because the most commonly planted tree species have high water requirements and are most often exposed to water shortage. This study assessed the effect of water deficit on diverse growth variables in saplings of Acacia visco (native tree species) and Morus alba (exotic tree species), two common tree species in the urban forests of Mendoza’s Metropolitan Area. Saplings were exposed to different levels of water deficit under controlled nursery conditions during three growing seasons. There were three watering treatments: replacement of (1) 100% transpired water (control treatment or T1), (2) 66% transpired water (moderate water deficit treatment or T2), and (3) 33% transpired water (severe water deficit treatment or T3). The impact of water stress was greater in the exotic tree-species, M. alba. The growth variables height, stem diameter, leaf area, and annual tree-ring width showed no significant differences between T1 and T2 in A. visco. In T3, tree growth was reduced in both species compared to T1. However, M. alba trees were more sensitive to any water deficit than A. visco. This latter species showed more resistance than M. alba to moderate water stress conditions, which even promoted growth of A. visco. These results highlight the importance of selecting tree species with low water consumption in sustainable urban forests of cities located in dryland environments.

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APA Style
CF, M., Roig, F., Cavagnaro, J., Cantón, M., Blasi, A.D. (2013). Effects of water deficit on urban forest growth in a dryland south america region. Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, 82(all), 151-160. https://doi.org/10.32604/phyton.2013.82.151
Vancouver Style
CF M, Roig F, Cavagnaro J, Cantón M, Blasi AD. Effects of water deficit on urban forest growth in a dryland south america region. Phyton-Int J Exp Bot. 2013;82(all):151-160 https://doi.org/10.32604/phyton.2013.82.151
IEEE Style
M. CF, F. Roig, J. Cavagnaro, M. Cantón, and A.D. Blasi "Effects of water deficit on urban forest growth in a dryland South America region," Phyton-Int. J. Exp. Bot., vol. 82, no. all, pp. 151-160. 2013. https://doi.org/10.32604/phyton.2013.82.151



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