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  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Performance Evaluation of Using Electrochemical Deposition as a Repair Method for Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Jiang-Jhy Chang1, Weichung Yeih1, Hui-Mi Hsu2, Nai-Min Huang1
    Structural Longevity, Vol.1, No.2, pp. 75-94, 2009, DOI:10.3970/sl.2009.001.075
    Abstract In this paper, the corrosion prevention capability and mechanical behavior of a cracked reinforced concrete beam repaired by the electrochemical deposition method were investigated. To evaluate the effects of repair, the crack closure percentage, the water permeability, the corrosion rate of the reinforcing steels and the remaining flexural strength of the repaired RC beams after 48 and 96-hour accelerating corrosion processes were evaluated. Cracks with widths of 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 mm and depths of 3, 7, 11 and 15 mm were artificially made on the RC beams. It was found that the crack closure percentage increased as the… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Damage Detection in a Geometrically Constrained Area1

    E.D. Swenson2, S.R. Soni3
    Structural Longevity, Vol.1, No.2, pp. 95-110, 2009, DOI:10.3970/sl.2009.001.095
    Abstract A "hot-spot" structural health monitoring (SHM) approach that uses lead zirconate titanate (PZT) sensor pairs to generate and sense Lamb waves is evaluated on a test article that accurately represents the complex geometry of a relatively inaccessible bulkhead section of an existing aircraft. This work is motivated by the fact that fatigue cracks have been known to propagate in this particular bulkhead in several aircraft. In order to simulate damage, electrical discharge machine (EDM) cuts are made to simulate real cracks in a test article. Because the damage occurs in a region of restricted geometry, PZT sensors must be placed… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Seismic Assessment and Rehabilitation of Historic Structures

    P. Gülkan1, S. T. Wasti1
    Structural Longevity, Vol.1, No.2, pp. 111-134, 2009, DOI:10.3970/sl.2009.001.111
    Abstract The post-earthquake assessment and rehabilitation of damaged structures, as also pre-emptive retrofitting of existing vulnerable buildings to resist a future earthquake, call for a systematic engineering approach, involving phases of detailed examination, computer model analyses, evaluation of material behavior and the development of suitable structural upgrading techniques. The task becomes more difficult when irreplaceable and monumental historic structures of antiquity must be made seismically secure. The present paper investigates the challenges posed by, and solutions needed, to ensure the structural longevity of historic structures. Case studies are described where principles stated in the context of achieving longevity for ancient monuments… More >

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