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  • Open Access

    ABSTRACT

    Multiscale Modeling of Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    Padmini Rangamani1,*

    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 22-22, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.08513

    Abstract Endocytosis is the process of uptake of cargo and fluid from the extracellular space to inside the cell; defects in endo- cytosis contribute to a wide spectrum of diseases including cancer, neurodegeneration, and heart disease. Clathrin- mediated endocytosis (CME) is an archetypal example of a membrane deformation process where multiple variables such as pre-existing membrane curvature, membrane bending due to the protein machinery, membrane tension regulation, and actin-mediated forces govern the progression of vesiculation. My group has been working for the past few years on deciphering the biophysical determinants of CME using multiscale modeling. We… More >

  • Open Access

    ABSTRACT

    From Cell Mechanobiology to Mechanomedicine: A Research Path Inspired by Fung - Dedicated to Prof. YC Fung on the Occasion of His Centennial Birthday

    Ning Wang1,*

    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 21-21, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07550

    Abstract Decades ago YC Fung proposed that mechanical stress could have substantial impacts on remodeling and growth of living tissues. Fung also proposed the concept of residual stress in blood vessels and quantified residual stress in excised arteries [1]. However, how stress influences cell and tissue functions remains elusive. At the cellular level, we have quantified myosin II mediated pre-existing tensile stress (prestress) in living cells and demonstrated that the prestress (the endogenous cytoskeletal tension) regulates cell stiffness, gene expression, and long-distance stress propagation in the cytoplasm to activate enzymes [2]. The prestress even impacts on… More >

  • Open Access

    ABSTRACT

    Mechanobiology of the Nuclear Pore Complex Machinery

    Mohammad R. K. Mofrad1,*

    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 19-20, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07429

    Abstract This article has no abstract. More >

  • Open Access

    ABSTRACT

    An Approach to Medical Device Innovation: Springboard from Dr. Fung’s Biomechanical Foundation

    G.S. Kassab1,*

    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 18-18, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.08416

    Abstract In celebration of Dr. Fung’s 100 birthday, the presentation will focus on a biomechanical design-based approach to innovation of medical devices that addresses unmet clinical needs ranging from cardiovascular diseases (e.g., ischemic heart disease and heart failure) to obesity. The technologies attempt to restore biomechanical homeostasis through a minimally invasive (e.g., percutaneous or laproscopic) approach in time efficient and cost-effective manner. The illustratory technologies include: A) A catheter for selective retroperfusion and “arterialization” of coronary veins for myocardial revascularization; B) A suction-based catheter for ease of trans-septal access; and C) A laproscopic and reversible restrictive More >

  • Open Access

    ABSTRACT

    Numerical Simulation of Myocardial Bridging in Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Mohammadali Sharzehee1, Yuan Chang2, Jiang-ping Song2, Hai-Chao Han1,*

    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 16-17, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07129

    Abstract A myocardial bridge (MB), a congenital anomaly of the coronary artery, occurs when a segment of the epicardial coronary artery goes underneath the myocardium. MBs are often observed in the middle part of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery. MB squeezes the vessel wall periodically and induces hemodynamic abnormalities which are correlated with angina and myocardial ischemia. The level of hemodynamics disturbances induced by MB depends on the myocardial bridge length, the degree of myocardial contractility, thickness, and location [1]. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), characterized by abnormal thickening of the heart wall, is a leading cause… More >

  • Open Access

    ABSTRACT

    Immune Cells Migrating through the Brain Endothelia Junctions Served as Shuttles for Nanoparticles Delivery to Glioblastoma

    Gloria B. Kim1,†, Qiong Wei2,†, Virginia Aragon-Sanabria1, Sulin Zhang2, Jian Yang1, Cheng Dong1,*

    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 15-15, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07137

    Abstract Most cells survive and grow by attaching and spreading on a substrate. They generate internal tension that contracts the cell body and thus exert tractions on the underlying substrate through focal adhesions. Traction force also plays a critical role in many biological processes, such as inflammation, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Thus, measuring the cell traction force provides valuable information on understanding the underlying mechanism of these biological processes. Here, a traction force microscopy (TFM) method using super thin hydrogels composed of immobilized fluorescent beads was utilized to quantify the mechanical forces generated during the transmigration of… More >

  • Open Access

    ABSTRACT

    Patient-Specific Computational Approach for Trans Catheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR): Pre-Procedural Planning for Enhancing Performance and Clinical Outcomes

    Ram P. Ghosh1, Matteo Bianchi1, Gil Marom2, Oren M. Rotman1, Brandon Kovarovic1, Danny Bluestein1,*

    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 12-14, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07379

    Abstract This article has no abstract. More >

  • Open Access

    ABSTRACT

    Molecular Mechanoimmunology

    Cheng Zhu1,*

    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 11-11, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.08411

    Abstract The immune response is orchestrated by a variety of immune cells. The function of each cell is determined by the collective signals from various immunoreceptors whose expression and activity depend on the developmental stages of the cell and its environmental context. Recent studies have highlighted the presence of mechanical forces on specific immunoreceptor–ligand bonds, which are transmitted across the cell membrane, potentially inducing mechanotransduction. As mechanobiology intersects with immunology, the interest to explore how immune cells sense, respond and adapt to their mechanical environment is rapidly growing. In this talk, I will review recent advances More >

  • Open Access

    ABSTRACT

    Development History, Progress and Future Prospects of Biomechanics and Biorheology in Chongqing University
    —For Specially Celebrating the Centennial of Professor Yuan-Cheng Fung

    Guixue Wang1,*, Li Yang1

    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 10-10, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.08410

    Abstract The biomechanics research of Chongqing University (CQU) began in the late 1970s, which has always been guided and helped by Prof. YC Fung. Prof. YP Wu, Prof. GR Wang at CQU were two of the earliest four Chinese scholars to visit and study in Fung's laboratory in the United States. In the autumn of 1979, Fung held a biomechanical workshop in CQU and the former Huazhong Institute of Technology. With the help of him, Prof. YP Wu founded the first Biomechanics Research Lab in China in the late 1970s. The first program for master’s degree… More >

  • Open Access

    ABSTRACT

    Quantifying Heterogeneity of Cell-ECM Interactions Through Integrated Biophysical Analyses

    William Leineweber1, Stephanie I. Fraley1,2,*

    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 9-9, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.08504

    Abstract Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions are critical modulators of repair and regeneration. However, variability within individual cells of the same cell type and within the ECM microenvironment can lead to heterogeneous outcomes that may limit the reliable application of cell-biomaterial constructs in regenerative medicine. Understanding the origins of heterogeneity is critical to overcoming this challenge and requires measurement of cell-ECM interactions at the single cell level. There are four core biophysical modules that cells employ to interact with their surrounding ECM: protrusion, adhesion, contractility, and matrix remodeling. Conventional approaches measure these interactions in separate experiments on… More >

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