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Realizing the potential of exploiting human IPSCs and their derivatives in research of Down syndrome

YAFEI WANG1,2,#, JIELEI NI1,#, YUHAN LIU2, DINGYING LIAO3, QIANWEN ZHOU1, XIAOYANG JI2, GANG NIU2, YANXIANG NI1,*

1 Nanophotonics Research Center, Institute of Microscale Optoelectronics & State Key Laboratory of Radio Frequency Heterogeneous Integration, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, 518060, China
2 Phil Rivers Technology, Beijing, 100871, China
3 Department of Ophthalmology, Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, Shenzhen, 518036, China

* Corresponding Author: YANXIANG NI. Email: email
# These authors contributed equally to this work

(This article belongs to the Special Issue: Perspectives on Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine)

BIOCELL 2023, 47(12), 2567-2578. https://doi.org/10.32604/biocell.2023.043781

Abstract

Down syndrome (DS) is a genetic condition characterized by intellectual disability, delayed brain development, and early onset Alzheimer’s disease. The use of primary neural cells and tissues is important for understanding this disease, but there are ethical and practical issues, including availability from patients and experimental manipulability. Moreover, there are significant genetic and physiological differences between animal models and humans, which limits the translation of the findings in animal studies to humans. Advancements in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) technology have revolutionized DS research by providing a valuable tool for studying the cellular and molecular pathologies associated with DS. Induced pluripotent stem cells derived from cells obtained from DS patients contain the patient’s entire genome including trisomy 21. Trisomic iPSCs as well as their derived cells or organoids can be useful for disease modeling, investigating the molecular mechanisms, and developing potential strategies for treating or alleviating DS. In this review, we focus on the use of iPSCs and their derivatives obtained from DS individuals and healthy humans for DS research. We summarize the findings from the past decade of DS studies using iPSCs and their derivatives. We also discuss studies using iPSC technology to investigate DS-associated genes (e.g., APP, OLIG1, OLIG2, RUNX1, and DYRK1A) and abnormal phenotypes (e.g., dysregulated mitochondria and leukemia risk). Lastly, we review the different strategies for mitigating the limitations of iPSCs and their derivatives, for alleviating the phenotypes, and for developing therapies.

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APA Style
WANG, Y., NI, J., LIU, Y., LIAO, D., ZHOU, Q. et al. (2023). Realizing the potential of exploiting human ipscs and their derivatives in research of down syndrome. BIOCELL, 47(12), 2567-2578. https://doi.org/10.32604/biocell.2023.043781
Vancouver Style
WANG Y, NI J, LIU Y, LIAO D, ZHOU Q, JI X, et al. Realizing the potential of exploiting human ipscs and their derivatives in research of down syndrome. BIOCELL . 2023;47(12):2567-2578 https://doi.org/10.32604/biocell.2023.043781
IEEE Style
Y. WANG et al., "Realizing the potential of exploiting human IPSCs and their derivatives in research of Down syndrome," BIOCELL , vol. 47, no. 12, pp. 2567-2578. 2023. https://doi.org/10.32604/biocell.2023.043781



cc This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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