Special lssues
Table of Content

Perspectives on Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine

Submission Deadline: 15 June 2024 Submit to Special Issue

Guest Editors

Prof. Jafar. Rezaie, Solid Tumor Research Center, Cellular and Molecular Medicine Institute, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Rezaie.j@umsu.ac.ir

Prof. Xinhua Liao, School of Life Sciences, Shanghai University, China. xinhualiao@foxmail.com

Prof. Shenglong Li, Department of Bone and Soft Tissue Tumor Surgery, Cancer Hospital of China Medical University, Liaoning Cancer Hospital & Institute, China. lishenglong@cancerhosp-ln-cmu.com

Dr. Jiannan Li, Department of General Surgery, The Second Hospital of Jilin University, China. jnli@ciac.ac.cn

Dr. Tongming Liu, Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, A-STAR, Singapore. dbsliutm@yahoo.com

Summary

Regenerative medicine purposes at the functional renewal of a damaged, malfunctioning, or missing tissue. There are approaches in regenerative medicine. For example, cell-based therapies, where cells are administered to restore a tissue either directly or through paracrine functions. Another approach is often referred to as classical tissue engineering, and consists of the combined use of cells and a biodegradable scaffold to form a tissue. In recent years, many researchers have shown that extracellular vesicles such as exosomes derived from stem cells can participate in regenerative medicine.  These particles are lipid membrane vesicles, containing many RNAs proteins, and transmembrane proteins presented in the fitting, and functional orientation. Extracellular vesicles can be combined in regenerative therapies, for example by simple injection, mixing with hydrogels, or coating scaffolds with extracellular vesicles using fibrin gels or specific linkers. Extracellular vesicles/exosomes can participate in regeneration of cardiovascular system, respiratory system, renal system, nervous system, skin and wound healing, and bone and cartilage regeneration. Clinical application of stem cells derived exosomes have been reported, however, some challenges remain unsolved.

 

· Stem cells in regenerative medicine

· Extracellular vesicles in regenerative medicine

· Exosomes of stem cells in regenerative medicine

· Exosomes and tissue engineering

· Modifying exosomes for regenerative medicine

· Exosomes as drug delivery system for regenerative medicine

· Biomaterials containing exosomes for regenerative medicine


Keywords

Extracellular vesicles, Exosomes, Regenerative medicine, Stem cells

Published Papers


  • Open Access

    REVIEW

    Three-dimensional cell-based strategies for liver regeneration

    DAN GUO, XI XIA, JIAN YANG
    BIOCELL, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2024.051095
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Perspectives on Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine)
    Abstract Liver regeneration and the development of effective therapies for liver failure remain formidable challenges in modern medicine. In recent years, the utilization of 3D cell-based strategies has emerged as a promising approach for addressing these urgent clinical requirements. This review provides a thorough analysis of the application of 3D cell-based approaches to liver regeneration and their potential impact on patients with end-stage liver failure. Here, we discuss various 3D culture models that incorporate hepatocytes and stem cells to restore liver function and ameliorate the consequences of liver failure. Furthermore, we explored the challenges in transitioning More >

  • Open Access

    REVIEW

    Therapeutic and regenerative potential of different sources of mesenchymal stem cells for cardiovascular diseases

    YARA ALZGHOUL, HALA J. BANI ISSA, AHMAD K. SANAJLEH, TAQWA ALABDUH, FATIMAH RABABAH, MAHA AL-SHDAIFAT, EJLAL ABU-EL-RUB, FATIMAH ALMAHASNEH, RAMADA R. KHASAWNEH, AYMAN ALZU’BI, HUTHAIFA MAGABLEH
    BIOCELL, Vol.48, No.4, pp. 559-569, 2024, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2024.048056
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Perspectives on Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine)
    Abstract Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are ideal candidates for treating many cardiovascular diseases. MSCs can modify the internal cardiac microenvironment to facilitate their immunomodulatory and differentiation abilities, which are essential to restore heart function. MSCs can be easily isolated from different sources, including bone marrow, adipose tissues, umbilical cord, and dental pulp. MSCs from various sources differ in their regenerative and therapeutic abilities for cardiovascular disorders. In this review, we will summarize the therapeutic potential of each MSC source for heart diseases and highlight the possible molecular mechanisms of each source to restore cardiac function. More >

  • Open Access

    REVIEW

    Mesenchymal stem cells and the angiogenic regulatory network with potential incorporation and modification for therapeutic development

    VAN THI TUONG NGUYEN, KHUONG DUY PHAM, HUONG THI QUE CAO, PHUC VAN PHAM
    BIOCELL, Vol.48, No.2, pp. 173-189, 2024, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.043664
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Perspectives on Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine)
    Abstract Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been proposed in regenerative medicine, especially for angiogenic purposes, due to their potential to self-renew, differentiate, and regulate the microenvironment. Peripheral vascular diseases, which are associated with reduced blood supply, have been treated but not cured. An effective therapy is to recover blood supply via vessel regeneration in the affected area, and MSCs appear to be promising for such conditions. Several studies aimed to explore the role of MSCs in performing angiogenesis and have revealed numerous potential methods to enhance MSC capacity in vessel formation. Efforts have been made to More >

    Graphic Abstract

    Mesenchymal stem cells and the angiogenic regulatory network with potential incorporation and modification for therapeutic development

  • Open Access

    REVIEW

    An overview of autophagy in the differentiation of dental stem cells

    XITONG ZHAO, TIANJUAN JU, XINWEI LI, CHANGFENG LIU, LULU WANG, LI-AN WU
    BIOCELL, Vol.48, No.1, pp. 47-64, 2024, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.045591
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Perspectives on Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine)
    Abstract Dental stem cells (DSCs) have attracted significant interest as autologous stem cells since they are easily accessible and give a minimal immune response. These properties and their ability to both maintain self-renewal and undergo multi-lineage differentiation establish them as key players in regenerative medicine. While many regulatory factors determine the differentiation trajectory of DSCs, prior research has predominantly been based on genetic, epigenetic, and molecular aspects. Recent evidence suggests that DSC differentiation can also be influenced by autophagy, a highly conserved cellular process responsible for maintaining cellular and tissue homeostasis under various stress conditions. This… More >

  • Open Access

    REVIEW

    Realizing the potential of exploiting human IPSCs and their derivatives in research of Down syndrome

    YAFEI WANG, JIELEI NI, YUHAN LIU, DINGYING LIAO, QIANWEN ZHOU, XIAOYANG JI, GANG NIU, YANXIANG NI
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.12, pp. 2567-2578, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.043781
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Perspectives on Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine)
    Abstract Down syndrome (DS) is a genetic condition characterized by intellectual disability, delayed brain development, and early onset Alzheimer’s disease. The use of primary neural cells and tissues is important for understanding this disease, but there are ethical and practical issues, including availability from patients and experimental manipulability. Moreover, there are significant genetic and physiological differences between animal models and humans, which limits the translation of the findings in animal studies to humans. Advancements in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) technology have revolutionized DS research by providing a valuable tool for studying the cellular and molecular… More >

  • Open Access

    REVIEW

    Exosomes in viral infection: Effects for pathogenesis and treatment strategies

    FATEMEH HEIDARI, REIHANEH SEYEDEBRAHIMI, PIAO YANG, MOHSEN ESLAMI FARSANI, SHIMA ABABZADEH, NASER KALHOR, HAMED MANOOCHEHRI, MOHSEN SHEYKHHASAN, MARYAM AZIMZADEH
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.12, pp. 2597-2608, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.043351
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Perspectives on Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine)
    Abstract Exosomes are small vesicles that carry molecules from one cell to another. They have many features that make them interesting for research, such as their stability, low immunogenicity, size of the nanoscale, toxicity, and selective delivery. Exosomes can also interact with viruses in diverse ways. Emerging research highlights the significant role of exosomes in viral infections, particularly in the context of diseases like COVID-19, HIV, HBV and HCV. Understanding the intricate interplay between exosomes and the human immune system holds great promise for the development of effective antiviral therapies. An important aspect is gaining clarity More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Inhibition of VEGF-A expression in hypoxia-exposed fetal retinal microvascular endothelial cells by exosomes derived from human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    JING LI, WANWAN FAN, LILI HAO, YONGSHENG LI, GUOCHENG YU, WEI SUN, XIANQIONG LUO, JINGXIANG ZHONG
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.11, pp. 2485-2494, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.044177
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Perspectives on Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine)
    Abstract Objective: This study aimed to investigate the potential of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (hucMSC)-derived exosomes (hucMSC-Exos) in inhibiting hypoxia-induced cell hyper proliferation and overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) in immature human fetal retinal microvascular endothelial cells (hfRMECs). Methods: Exosomes were isolated from hucMSCs using cryogenic ultracentrifugation and characterized through various techniques, including transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis, bicinchoninic acid assays, and western blotting. The hfRMECs were identified using von Willebrand factor (vWF) co-staining and divided into four groups: a control group cultured under normoxic condition, a hypoxic model group, a hypoxic… More >

    Graphic Abstract

    Inhibition of VEGF-A expression in hypoxia-exposed fetal retinal microvascular endothelial cells by exosomes derived from human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

Share Link