Home / Journals / BIOCELL / Vol.47, No.10, 2023
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  • Open AccessOpen Access

    REVIEW

    Regulatory role of NFAT1 signaling in articular chondrocyte activities and osteoarthritis pathogenesis

    MINGCAI ZHANG, TANNER CAMPBELL, SPENCER FALCON, JINXI WANG*
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.10, pp. 2125-2132, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.030161
    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of joint disease, is characterized clinically by joint pain, stiffness, and deformity. OA is now considered a whole joint disease; however, the breakdown of the articular cartilage remains the major hallmark of the disease. Current treatments targeting OA symptoms have a limited impact on impeding or reversing the OA progression. Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying OA development is a critical barrier to progress in OA therapy. Recent studies by the current authors’ group and others have revealed that the nuclear factor of activated T cell 1 (NFAT1), More >

    Graphic Abstract

    Regulatory role of NFAT1 signaling in articular chondrocyte activities and osteoarthritis pathogenesis

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    VIEWPOINT

    Future of the current anticoronaviral agents: A viewpoint on the validation for the next COVIDs and pandemics

    AMGAD M. RABIE*
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.10, pp. 2133-2139, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.030057
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Antimicrobial Resistance: From Basic Science to Applied Approaches)
    Abstract Despite the global decline in the severity of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases, the disease still represents a major concern to the relevant scientific and medical communities. The primary concern of drug scientists, virologists, and other concerned specialists in this respect is to find ready-to-use suitable and potent anticoronaviral therapies that are broadly effective against the different species/strains of the coronaviruses in general, not only against the current and previous coronaviruses (e.g., the recently-appeared severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 “SARS-CoV-2”), i.e., effective antiviral agents for treatment and/or prophylaxis of any coronaviral infections, including More >

    Graphic Abstract

    Future of the current anticoronaviral agents: A viewpoint on the validation for the next COVIDs and pandemics

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    REVIEW

    Cellular and molecular insights into microbiota-mitochondria interplay, therapeutic biomarkers and interventional approaches in COVID-19: A review

    VIBHAV VARSHNEY1,*, PRASHANT SINGH KUSHWAH2, NEETU AGRAWAL1, AHSAS GOYAL1,*, GOVIND SINGH2
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.10, pp. 2141-2149, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.030853
    Abstract The persistent global pandemic, COVID-19, stems from the pathogenic influence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), yielding an unprecedented worldwide crisis. With reference to a WHO report, the count of COVID-19 cases had exceeded 754 million by February 03, 2023. Intriguingly, emerging research has spotlighted the intricate interplay of gut microbiota and mitochondrial entities, acting as potent immunomodulatory factors at the cellular and molecular levels. This interconnection operates through a series of dynamic mechanisms. SARS-CoV-2 infection perturbs the delicate equilibrium of gut microbiota, leading to dysbiosis—a signature biomarker. This imbalance is intrinsically linked More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    REVIEW

    Role of RIPK1 in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    XUNAN ZHAO#, EMMANUEL MAGO#, DAN WENG*
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.10, pp. 2151-2162, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.030570
    Abstract Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening pulmonary disease typically caused by microbial infections, trauma, inhalation of harmful gases, and other factors. It is characterized by an inflammation in the lungs and increased alveolar permeability, leading to pulmonary edema and consequently, a low oxygen supply or hypoxemia. ARDS is responsible for 1 in 10 admissions to intensive care units, and the mortality rate for patients with severe ARDS is as high as 46%. Extensive efforts have been devoted to investigating the pathological mechanisms of ARDS to develop new effective clinical strategies. Recent studies have More >

    Graphic Abstract

    Role of RIPK1 in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    REVIEW

    Exploring exosomes to provide evidence for the treatment and prediction of Alzheimer’s disease

    XIANGYU QUAN1, XUETING MA1, GUODONG LI2, XUEQI FU1, JIANGTAO LI1, LINLIN ZENG1,*
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.10, pp. 2163-2176, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.031226
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Novel Biomarkers in Diseases for Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis)
    Abstract Exosomes are extracellular vesicles with a 30–150 nm diameter originating from endosomes. In recent years, scientists have regarded exosomes as an ideal small molecule carrier for the targeted treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) across the blood-brain barrier due to their nanoscale size and low immunogenicity. A large amount of evidence shows that exosomes are rich in biomarkers, and it has been found that the changes in biomarker content in blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine are often associated with the onset of AD patients. In this paper, some recent advances in the use of exosomes in More >

    Graphic Abstract

    Exploring exosomes to provide evidence for the treatment and prediction of Alzheimer’s disease

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    REVIEW

    The role of FZR1 in tumorigenesis: Focus on cell-cycle control

    HUI LI1, CHENGFANG ZHOU2, MEI KUANG2, YUN LIU1,*, JIEPING CHEN1,2,*
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.10, pp. 2177-2186, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.029373
    Abstract Fizzy-related protein homolog 1 (FZR1) mainly functions as a specific activator of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) in the cell cycle and controls the G0 and G1 phases of the cell cycle. We highlight recent work that has studied the role of FZR1 in tumorigenesis, growth, differentiation, and genome stability through cell-cycle control. We summarize the current state of knowledge regarding FZR1 structure, function, and the distinct ways of APC/C dysregulation in solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. We also discuss novel approaches for targeting the FZR1 as a cancer therapy and research area for future work. More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    REVIEW

    The bacterial small RNAs: The new biomarkers of oral microbiota-associated cancers and diseases

    MENGYING MAO1,2,3,#, TING DONG1,2,3,#, YANJING LIANG3,4, KEYONG YUAN1,2,3, QIAOQIAO JIN1,2,3, PENGFEI ZHANG1,2,3, ZHENGWEI HUANG1,2,3,*
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.10, pp. 2187-2193, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.042357
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Identification of Genetic and Epigenetic Markers for Complex Diseases via Integrating Multistage Biological Data)
    Abstract The oral microbiota is a vital part of the human microbiota that functions in various physiological processes and is highly relevant to cancers and other diseases. With the alterations of host immune competence, the homeostatic balance existing between the oral microbiota and host may be disturbed and result in the development of diseases. Numerous observations have suggested that small RNAs are key regulators of bacterial pathogenesis and bacteria-host interactions. Further, bacterial small RNAs are considered to be promising biomarkers for the development of novel, and efficacious therapies for oral dysbiosis. Mechanistic insights into how oral More >

    Graphic Abstract

    The bacterial small RNAs: The new biomarkers of oral microbiota-associated cancers and diseases

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    REVIEW

    Possible therapeutic role of short-chain fatty acids from skin commensal bacteria in UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis

    PAVITHRA SUBRAMANI1,2, RAUNAK KUMAR DAS1,*
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.10, pp. 2195-2205, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.030383
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Application of Deep Learning in Cancer)
    Abstract Solar ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation is a major skin cancer-causing agent. Initiation, promotion, and progression are the diverse phases of UVB-induced carcinogenesis. Exposure to UVB causes abnormalities in a series of biochemical and molecular pathways: thymine dimer formation, DNA damage, oxidative stress, inflammatory responses, and altered cell signaling, eventually resulting in tumor formation. The increased skin cancer rates urge researchers to develop more efficient drugs, but synthetic chemotherapeutic drugs have more contrary effects and drug resistance issues, which have been reported recently. The current review focuses on the relationship between microbes and cancer. Human skin… More >

    Graphic Abstract

    Possible therapeutic role of short-chain fatty acids from skin commensal bacteria in UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    REVIEW

    CPT1A in cancer: Tumorigenic roles and therapeutic implications

    SHENGJIE SONG, ZHIZHOU SHI*
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.10, pp. 2207-2215, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.027677
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Mitochondrial Signaling and Metabolism in Cancer)
    Abstract Metabolic reprogramming frequently occurs in the majority of cancers, wherein fatty acid oxidation (FAO) is usually induced and serves as a compensatory mechanism to improve energy consumption. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A) is the rate-limiting enzyme for FAO and is widely involved in tumor growth, metastasis, and chemo-/radio-resistance. This review summarizes the most recent advances in understanding the oncogenic roles and mechanisms of CPT1A in tumorigenesis, including in proliferation and tumor growth, invasion and metastasis, and the tumor microenvironment. Importantly, CPT1A has been shown to be a biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis prediction and proved to More >

    Graphic Abstract

    CPT1A in cancer: Tumorigenic roles and therapeutic implications

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ARTICLE

    Structure, function, and mechanism of the TNFAIP8 (TIPE) family of proteins in cancer and inflammation

    ZIPENG LIN1,#, CHUXI TANG1,#, LE KANG2, GUANXI LAI1, SHIWEN LIU1, YIXIANG WU1, HUIQUN TIAN3,*, SONG LIU1,4,5,*
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.10, pp. 2217-2232, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.030233
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Frontiers in cancer: tumor microenvironment)
    Abstract The multiple roles of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-inducible protein 8 (TNFAIP8), also named TIPE family of proteins have been shown in tumor and inflammation progression and regulation of cellular autophagy and apoptosis. In this review, we found that the TIPE family showed highly homologous sequences and conserved functional domains, such as the death effector domain (DED)-like domain but displayed different roles and mechanisms in different biological activities. For example, while TIPE is primarily associated with tumor progression and antitumor drug resistance, TIPE1 suppresses tumor progression in most instances. TIPE2 has multiple roles in tumor More >

    Graphic Abstract

    Structure, function, and mechanism of the TNFAIP8 (TIPE) family of proteins in cancer and inflammation

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    REVIEW

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts of colorectal cancer: Translational prospects in liquid biopsy and targeted therapy

    ELYN AMIELA SALLEH1, YEONG YEH LEE2, ANDEE DZULKARNAEN ZAKARIA3, NUR ASYILLA CHE JALIL4, MARAHAINI MUSA1,*
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.10, pp. 2233-2244, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.030541
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Frontiers in cancer: tumor microenvironment)
    Abstract Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major global health concern. Accumulation of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in CRC is associated with poor prognosis and disease recurrence. CAFs are the main cellular component of the tumor microenvironment. CAF-tumor cell interplay, which is facilitated by various secretomes, drives colorectal carcinogenesis. The complexity of CAF populations contributes to the heterogeneity of CRC and influences patient survival and treatment response. Due to their significant roles in colorectal carcinogenesis, different clinical applications utilizing or targeting CAFs have been suggested. Circulating CAFs (cCAFs) which can be detected in blood samples, have been proposed… More >

    Graphic Abstract

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts of colorectal cancer: Translational prospects in liquid biopsy and targeted therapy

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    HOXB8 contributed to oxaliplatin chemo-resistance in colon cancer cells by activating STAT3

    LIANLI NI1,2,#, YUN YU1,2,#, HAN LIN1,2, WEISHAN ZHUGE2, LU TAO2, YIWEI SHEN2, RI CUI2,*, SHAOTANG LI1,2,*
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.10, pp. 2245-2254, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.030147
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Frontiers in cancer: tumor microenvironment)
    Abstract Background: Homeobox B8 (HOXB8), a member of HOX family, plays a key role in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the function of HOXB8 in oxaliplatin (OXA) resistance in CRC is still unclear. This study investigated the role and precise molecular mechanism of HOXB8 in OXA-resistant CRC cells. Methods: The cell viability was measured by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and the colony forming ability was determined by colony formation assay. The silencing RNA (siRNA) approach was used to knockdown HOXB8 in CRC cells while the lentiviral transfection system was used to establish… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    Anisodine hydrobromide alleviates oxidative stress caused by hypoxia/reoxygenation in human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells predominantly via inhibition of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor 4

    WENLI JIANG1,#, JUNYI SHEN1,#, XIAOQIANG DU1,#, YAN QIU1, JIAN ZHONG1, ZHI OUYANG1, BINGMEI M. FU2, YE ZENG1,*
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.10, pp. 2255-2263, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.030880
    Abstract Background: Anisodine hydrobromide (AT3), an anti-cholinergic agent, could be delivered to the brain across the blood-brain barrier and has been used clinically for the treatment of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. Endothelial dysfunction can be caused by hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) via oxidative stress and metabolic alterations. The present study investigated whether AT3 regulates the production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the HIF-1α pathway via regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in brain microvascular endothelial cells after H/R exposure. Methods: Under H/R conditions, hCMEC/D3 cerebral microvascular endothelial cells were treated with AT3. Specific inhibitors… More >

    Graphic Abstract

    Anisodine hydrobromide alleviates oxidative stress caused by hypoxia/reoxygenation in human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells predominantly via inhibition of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor 4

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    Ring finger protein 157 is a prognostic biomarker and is associated with immune infiltrates in human breast cancer

    XIN ZHU1,2,#, BIN XIAO3,#,*, WENWU ZHANG3,4, XIAOYU SONG3, WEI GONG5, LINHAI LI3,*, XINPING CHEN1,2,*
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.10, pp. 2265-2281, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.029195
    Abstract Background: The protein encoded by ring finger protein 157 (RNF157) is known to function as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. However, whether the level of RNF157 expression in breast cancer correlates with prognosis and immune cell infiltration among breast cancer patients remains to be further explored. Methods: In this study, publicly available datasets were used for evaluating RNF157 expression in different tumors compared with normal samples. Several independent datasets were screened for investigating the relationship between RNF157 and breast cancer survival, different mutation profiles, and tumor immune cell infiltration. We conducted a pathway enrichment analysis to… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    Identification of STAT5B as a biomarker for an early diagnosis of endometrial carcinoma

    XUELIAN CHEN1,*, YUNZHENG ZHANG2, JUNJIAN HE3, YIBING LI4
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.10, pp. 2283-2300, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.030086
    Abstract Background: The late detection of endometrial carcinoma (EC) at an advanced stage often results in a poor patient prognosis. It is hence important to identify reliable biomarkers to facilitate early detection of EC. Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family members play an important role in several tumors, however, their impact on EC development and progression remains unclear. Methods: Machine learning methods were used to investigate the importance of STAT5B in EC. Results: Hence, we explored the UALCAN data mining platform and found that while STAT1 and STAT2 were upregulated, STAT5A, STAT5B, and STAT6 were… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    MiR-19a-3p/PTEN axis regulates the anticancer effect of circHIAT1 in breast cancer in vitro

    CHAO NIU1,#, RUOFEI SUN1,#, XIAOGANG LI2, BO LI2, XIAODONG HE1,*
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.10, pp. 2301-2312, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.029935
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Non-Coding RNAs in the Regulation of Human Cancers)
    Abstract Objective: Breast cancer is a major cancer threatening the health of women globally. To elucidate the effect of the circHIAT1/miR-19a-3p/phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) axis on regulating the malignant phenotype of breast cancer cells. Methods: The mRNA expression pattern of circHIAT1, miR-19a-3p, and PTEN was checked by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Then, the knockdown assay was carried out to explore the effect of circHIAT1 and miR-19a-3p on breast cancer. The relative cell experiments, including MTT assay, scratch assay, transwell invasion assay, and flow cytometry analysis, were conducted to verify the influence of circHIAT1 and miR-19a-3p… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ARTICLE

    Long non-coding RNA-ATB induces trastuzumab resistance and aggravates the progression of gastric cancer by repressing miR- 200c via ZNF217 elevation

    JIAZHUANG LI*, WEI ZHANG, SHOUBAO GAO, LI SUN, QINGYANG TAI, YING LIU
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.10, pp. 2313-2320, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.029860
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Non-Coding RNAs in the Regulation of Human Cancers)
    Abstract Background: Trastuzumab resistance accounts for chemotherapy failure in gastric cancer patients in clinical practice. The significance of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the maintenance of drug resistance in gastric cancer has been already underlined. Method: This study aimed to identify the specific role of lncRNA-ATB in gastric cancer progression and trastuzumab resistance. The downstream miRs of lncRNA-ATB and target genes of miRs were predicted by bioinformatics analysis and verified using dual luciferase reporter assay. Loss- and gain-function assays were performed to explore the roles of lncRNA-ATB, miR-200c, and zinc-finger protein 217 (ZNF217) in the cell functions More >

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