Home / Journals / BIOCELL / Vol.31, No.3, 2007
Table of Content
  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Isolation and biological characterization of a basic phospholipase A2 from Bothrops jararacussu snake venom

    S.L. MARUÑAK*, L. LEIVA**, M.E. GARCIA DENEGRI*, P. TEIBLER*, O. ACOSTA DE PÉREZ*
    BIOCELL, Vol.31, No.3, pp. 355-364, 2007, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2007.31.355
    Abstract A phospholipase A2 has been isolated from Bothrops jararacussu venom from snakes that inhabit the northeast region of Argentina. The present study describes in vivo and in vitro biological activities of phospholipase A2 from B. jararacussu as well as isolation details of its. Venom was obtained by milking of adult snakes which were housing in wood reptile cages of varying dimensions in heated (20–30ºC) rooms. Snakes received a weekly diet of mice and water was available ad libitum for drinking and soaking. The enzyme was purified by gel filtration on a Sephadex G-75 column followed by ion exchange chromatography on… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Karyological and electrophoretic differences between Pomacea flagellata and P. patula catemacensis (Caenogastropoda: Ampullariidae)

    MARÍA ESTHER DIUPOTEX-CHONG*, NÉSTOR J. CAZZANIGA**, MANUEL URIBE-ALCOCER*
    BIOCELL, Vol.31, No.3, pp. 365-373, 2007, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2007.31.365
    Abstract The widespread Mexican apple snail Pomacea flagellata (Say 1827) and the strictly endemic "tegogolo" P. patula catemacensis (Baker 1922) (restricted to Lake Catemaco), are the only known American Ampullariidae that have haploid complements n=13. Pomacea patula catemacensis has suffered a critical reduction in abundance due to immoderate fishing for human consumption. Chromosome slides were obtained from colchicine-injected Pomacea snails collected from nine locations along the coastal zone of the Gulf of Mexico, including Lake Catemaco, for use in principal component analysis (PCA). Total proteins in foot homogenates were analyzed through isoelectric focusing (IEF) and native-PAGE electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gels. The… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Morphological and histochemical study of the masseter muscle after occlusal alteration

    JOÃO PAULO MARDEGAN ISSA*, RODRIGO TIOSSI*, MAMIE MIZUSAKI IYOMASA**
    BIOCELL, Vol.31, No.3, pp. 375-382, 2007, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2007.31.375
    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate alterations in the masseter muscle of 30 male guinea-pigs submitted to occlusal alteration. The animals were divided into 2 equal groups, the control group (C) only submitted to surgical stress, and the occlusal altered group (T) submitted to teeth extraction. Each group was subdivided into 3 groups, with 5 animals, for the following studies: macroscopy and vessels distribution, light microscopy and histochemical analysis, with animals’ perfusion 2 months after surgery. Data were submitted to statistical analysis. Macroscopically, an anteroposterior orientation of the muscular fibers was found and statistical difference between C and… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Effects of desiccation on Euterpe edulis Martius seeds

    VÍCTOR PANZA1,2, VERÓNICA LÁINEZ2 , SARA MALDONADO1,2, HORACIO L. MARODER3
    BIOCELL, Vol.31, No.3, pp. 383-390, 2007, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2007.31.383
    Abstract Information on desiccation sensitivity of Euterpe edulis seeds under two drying rates is presented. The sensitivity was studied during the course of germination and normal germination. The water content was evaluated for both seeds and embryos. Results showed the following: (a) For both drying treatments and for both germination and normal germination, desiccation sensitivity values were higher for measurements based on the water content of the embryo than for those of the seed. (b) For both drying treatments, desiccation sensitivity were higher for normal germination than for germination based on both the embryo and seed water contents. (c) Under the… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Decrease of intestinal tumors induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine in rats fed with cow milk and buffalo milk

    M. Sánchez Negrette, M.A. Montenegro, M.S. Catuogno, W.J. Lértora, M.C. Guanziroli
    BIOCELL, Vol.31, No.3, pp. 391-396, 2007, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2007.31.391
    Abstract Epidemiological studies in human beings and experimental studies in laboratory animals suggest that milk and dairy products can inhibit effects on the development of some kinds of tumors. Cow milk contains sphingomyelin, butyric acid, conjugated linoleic acid, calcium, vitamin A, carotene and vitamin D. All of these components are known to inhibit the process of carcinogenesis. Our objective was to determine the effect of cow milk and water buffalo milk on the development of colon neoplasias in an experimental model of carcinogenesis in rats induced with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). Three-month-old Wistar male rats with an average body weight of 180 g… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Immunophenotypic evaluation, and physiological and laboratory correlations of hematopoietic stem cells from umbilical cord blood

    R. Canabarro1,2, H. Sporleder2, T. Gomes3,4, G. Zanatta3,5, L. Scribel3,6, F. Freitas7, J. Neumann2, P. Pranke1,3
    BIOCELL, Vol.31, No.3, pp. 397-403, 2007, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2007.31.397
    Abstract The use of umbilical cord blood stem cells is an efficient alternative for the transplantation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. A number of factors can influence the volume and amount of CD34+ cells, which are considered as immature and capable of proliferation. Quantification of CD34+ cells, evaluation of CD38 and c-kit molecules on these cells, as well as correlations of such factors as maternal age, gestational age, newborn sex and weight, umbilical cord length, placental weight with increased volume and concentration of immature cells, among others, were performed in 70 blood samples from term newborns. The mean volume of umbilical cord… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Technical Note : Prolonged exposure of human embryonic stem cells to heat shock induces necrotic cell death

    B.C. Heng*, K.J. Vinoth*, K. Lu*, X. Deng*, Z. Ge*, B.H. Bay**, T. Cao*
    BIOCELL, Vol.31, No.3, pp. 405-410, 2007, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2007.31.405
    Abstract We investigated the effects of prolonged heat shock treatment on human embryonic stem cell (hESC) viability. The hESC viability steadily declined with longer exposure to heat shock treatment (43ºC). After 4 h of exposure to heat shock at 43ºC, only 56.2 ± 1.5% of cells were viable. Viability subsequently declined to 37.0 ± 3.3% and 3.5 ± 0.7% after 8 h and 16 h, respectively of heat shock treatment at 43ºC. Transmission electron micrographs showed that the morphology of the dead/dying cells after heat shock treatment was characteristic of cellular necrosis with an uncondensed chromatin and a non-intact plasma membrane.… More >

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