Home / Journals / SDHM / Vol.3, No.1, 2007
  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Finite Element Based Durability Assessment of a Free Piston Linear Engine Component

    M. M. Rahman1, A. K. Ariffin1, S. Abdullah1, N. Jamaludin1
    Structural Durability & Health Monitoring, Vol.3, No.1, pp. 1-14, 2007, DOI:10.3970/sdhm.2007.003.001
    Abstract A modern computational approach based on finite element analysis for durability assessment in a two-stroke free piston linear engine component using the variable amplitude loadings is presented. This paper describes the finite element analysis techniques to predict the fatigue life and identify the critical locations of the component. The effect of mean stress on the fatigue life is also investigated. The finite element modeling and analysis has been performed using a computer-aided design and a finite element analysis software package, and the fatigue life prediction was carried out using finite element based fatigue life prediction codes. The fatigue crack initiation… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Two-dimensional Numerical Estimation of Stress Intensity Factors and Crack Propagation in Linear Elastic Analysis

    Abdulnaser M. Alshoaibi1,2, M. S. A. Hadi2, A. K. Ariffin2
    Structural Durability & Health Monitoring, Vol.3, No.1, pp. 15-28, 2007, DOI:10.3970/sdhm.2007.003.015
    Abstract An adaptive finite element method is employed to analyze two-dimensional linear elastic fracture problems. The mesh is generated by the advancing front method and the norm stress error is taken as a posteriori error estimator for the h-type adaptive refinement. The stress intensity factors are estimated by a displacement extrapolation technique. The near crack tip displacements used are obtained from specific nodes of natural six-noded quarter-point elements which are generated around the crack tip defined by the user. The crack growth and its direction are determined by the calculated stress intensity factors as the maximum circumference theory is also been… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Integrity of Thermal Actuators using the Concept of Energy Density

    C.P. Providakis1
    Structural Durability & Health Monitoring, Vol.3, No.1, pp. 29-34, 2007, DOI:10.3970/sdhm.2007.003.029
    Abstract Actuators are structures that give micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) the ability to interact with their environment rather than just passively sensing it. Recent studies of MEMS thermal micro-actuators have shown that simple in design and production devices can provide deflection of the order of 10 μm at low voltages. Recently, metals and single-crystal silicon materials were included in the range of materials used for thermal actuators since they operate at lower temperatures than the commonly used (poly)silicon devices. These actuators are liable to meet the loads in service, so the corresponding integrity and stability analysis constitutes a topic of interest on… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Structural Integrity and Durability of High Voltage Composite (Non-Ceramic) Insulators

    M. Kumosa1
    Structural Durability & Health Monitoring, Vol.3, No.1, pp. 35-50, 2007, DOI:10.3970/sdhm.2007.003.035
    Abstract This paper deals with the structural integrity and durability of suspension composite (non-ceramic, polymer) insulators widely used in power transmission systems around the world. Under certain conditions, the insulators can fail in-service both electrically and mechanically resulting in the drop of energized transmission lines and power outages. In this work, predominantly mechanical failures of the insulators are discussed. In particular, the most important characteristics of a catastrophic failure process called brittle fracture are described. Subsequently, two examples of insulator failures by brittle fracture are shown and their causes explained. Finally, several recommendations on how to avoid brittle fracture as well… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Role of Residual Stress in Structural Integrity Assessment of Cracked Components at Elevated Temperatures

    Kamran Nikbin1
    Structural Durability & Health Monitoring, Vol.3, No.1, pp. 51-68, 2007, DOI:10.3970/sdhm.2007.003.051
    Abstract Weldments and welded regions of components are likely to see failure at elevated temperatures earlier than homogenous parent material. In some cases variable loading could also introduce creep/fatigue crack growth. These weld regions not only contain variable creep properties but are likely to contain residual stresses which could relax in time. There are three key factors which may determine a successful outcome for remaining life assessment of engineering components containing residual stresses in the vicinity of welds. The first is standardized testing and measurement procedures. The second is the development of appropriate and accurate correlating parameters to treat the results… More >

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