Home / Journals / SDHM / Vol.6, No.2, 2010
  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    An Analysis of Dome Reversal in Metal Beverage Container Based on Finite Element Methods

    Muddasar Khan1, Cesar Levy1, Amer Hameed1, Zulfiqar Khan1, Khalid Orakzai1, Musarrat Khan1, Khuram Shahazad1, Afzaal M.Malik1, Shahab Khushnood1
    Structural Durability & Health Monitoring, Vol.6, No.2, pp. 53-68, 2010, DOI:10.3970/sdhm.2010.006.053
    Abstract Aluminum metal beverage container is used in packaging foods and chemical industries because of its superior hold, formability, corrosion resistance and join ability. The 80 percent of the container cost is material and aluminum metal is expansive one. The beverage container industry is struggling for potential saving from weight reduction in each container, while meeting the three structural performance standards which have been established to assess the adequacy of the container design. These are axial column load, drop resistance and internal pressure. This paper relates to the internal pressure standard which states that container must withstand at least 90-100PSI or… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Advancements in the Automotive Durability Process

    Mark Pompetzki1, Brian Dabell1, Xiaobin Lin2
    Structural Durability & Health Monitoring, Vol.6, No.2, pp. 69-76, 2010, DOI:10.3970/sdhm.2010.006.069
    Abstract Structural integrity in terms of automotive durability is a detailed process that incorporates many technical areas. The current durability process for automotive applications involves understanding operational load inputs, the stresses and strains caused and the response of the material, performing fatigue tests, calculating fatigue life and interpreting results. There are many variations on this process depending on the application, materials, available information, methods, etc. This paper presents a general approach for the durability process in automotive applications and highlights a number of new advancements. These advancements include understanding the service operating load conditions through improved usage based monitoring, characterizing new… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Weight Functions for Structural Integrity Assessment: Method and Applications

    Xue-Ren Wu1
    Structural Durability & Health Monitoring, Vol.6, No.2, pp. 77-88, 2010, DOI:10.3970/sdhm.2010.006.077
    Abstract A review of the state-of-the-art is presented on the weight function method for fracture-mechanics-based structural integrity assessment with regard to crack-like defects. The weight function method provides a powerful tool for the determination of key parameters, such as stress intensity factors and crack opening displacements for cracked structural components. For two dimensional (2D) crack problems, weight functions were obtained in closed-form for both centre-and edge-crack configurations. For three dimensional(3D) cases, a combination of the closed-form 2D weight functions and the slice synthesis technique makes it possible for rapid determination of stress intensity factor at any point along the crack front.… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    A New Method for Maintenance Management Employing Principal Component Analysis

    Fausto Pedro García Márquez1
    Structural Durability & Health Monitoring, Vol.6, No.2, pp. 89-100, 2010, DOI:10.3970/sdhm.2010.006.089
    Abstract This paper presents a simple graphic method for detecting and classifying faults in point mechanisms based on the study of some statistical parameters of the force and current signals of the point machine. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) employed in order to reduce the number of these parameters. PCA is utilised in this paper for modifying the parameter dataset, and reducing the coordinate system by linear transformation. It is then possible to plot the new coordinate system in 2 or 3 dimensions, where the faults can be detected and identified. In this work most of the faults could be detected, but… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Application of GB/T 19426-2004 “Safety Assessment for In-Service Pressure Vessels Containing Defects” to the Long-Distance Oil Pipeline

    Zihua Zhao1, Yu Zhou, Zheng Zhang, Qunpeng Zhong
    Structural Durability & Health Monitoring, Vol.6, No.2, pp. 101-112, 2010, DOI:10.3970/sdhm.2010.006.101
    Abstract Annex H"Safety assessment method for straight pressure pipeline with local thinning area" of "Safety assessment for in-service pressure vessels containing defects"(GB/T 19426-2004) is briefly introduced. The maximum allowable hanging (unsupported) length of straight pressure pipeline with a local thinning area (LTA) is then determined by using this assessment method. This is the first time that the assessment method has been applied to the long-distance oil pipeline. As a typical case, we have analyzed a length of straight pressure pipeline with LTA and gave the relationship of maximum allowable unsupported length, operating pressure and the depth of LTA. More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Influence of Structural Defects on the Beneficial Effect of Autofrettage

    S. Hadidi-Moud1,2, H. Makari1
    Structural Durability & Health Monitoring, Vol.6, No.2, pp. 113-122, 2010, DOI:10.3970/sdhm.2010.006.113
    Abstract A comprehensive numerical study has been carried out to investigate and to explore the impact of the presence of part through surface cracks of various size and orientation in a thick welded ferritic steel cylindrical vessel, on the beneficial effect of autofrettage loading. It is well known that autofrettage loading enhances the load carrying capacity of defect free pressure vessels. The results of this study suggest that in presence of cracks, the localised near crack tip residual stress fields interact with in service stresses and influence the enhancement in load carrying capacity of autofrettaged vessel. Furthermore it is concluded that… More >

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