Special Issues

Social Stress, Adversity, and Mental Health in Transitional China

Submission Deadline: 10 March 2024 (closed) View: 104

Guest Editors

Name:Junxiu Wang
Title:Professor
Email:wang_jx@cass.org.cn
Bio:
Junxiu Wang is a director and research follow of the Research Center of Social Psychology, Institute of Sociology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences,and professor of the University of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. He is interested in social mentality in China's social transformation. He has published a large number of articles and books on social psychology, and he annually edited the Research Report on China's Social Psychology.

Name: Tao Xu
Title: Associated Professor
Email: xutao@zjnu.edu.cn
Bio:
Tao Xu received the Ph.D. degree from the department of sociology, Sun Yat-sen University in 2010. He is an associate professor at Zhejiang Normal University and used to be a visiting scholar at SUNY Albany. He is interested in psychological health and social inequality. Currently, he is mainly devoted to psychological health and healthcare, Education and Income Inequality, Migration.
Evidence-based sociological research. More information can be found at ORCID (https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6487-6664).

Summary

As China continues to undergo economic development and social change, the stresses and adversities of the transitional period have become a widespread concern. These issues not only have adverse effects on individuals’ physical and mental health but also have important impacts on the development and stability of the entire society. To better understand and address these problems, we invite experts, scholars, and practitioners from all walks of life to explore social stress, adversity, and mental health in transitional China and share their experiences and thoughts.

 

We welcome submissions that approach the topic from the following angles, but are not limited to:

 

Sources and influencing factors of social stress and adversity

Psychological crises and challenges in the transitional society

The role and practice of social work in mitigating social stress and adversity

Strategies for preventing and treating mental health problems

The impact of education, employment, and marriage on mental health in transitional China

Internet-based mental health services and support

 

The aim of this special topic is to promote academic exchange and advance the development of the field. We welcome original research papers, reviews, and practice reports that approach the topic from theoretical, practical, and case analysis perspectives.

We welcome scholars and practitioners to submit their work and make contributions to the exploration of social stress, adversity, and mental health in transitional China.



Published Papers


  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    The Influence of Vulnerable Narcissism on Social Anxiety among Adolescents: The Mediating Role of Self-Concept Clarity and Self-Esteem

    Yuetan Wang, Xianle Yan, Lili Liu, Xiran Lu, Lan Luo, Xiaobin Ding
    International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, Vol.26, No.6, pp. 429-438, 2024, DOI:10.32604/ijmhp.2024.050445
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Social Stress, Adversity, and Mental Health in Transitional China)
    Abstract Social anxiety (SA) is a prevalent mental health issue among adolescents, and vulnerable narcissism (VN) can exacerbate this condition. This study aims to investigate the impact of vulnerable narcissism on social anxiety in adolescents, specifically focusing on the mediating effects of self-concept clarity (SCC) and self-esteem (SE) in the relationship between vulnerable narcissism and social anxiety. Through cluster sampling, a questionnaire survey was conducted among 982 students from three secondary schools in two provinces. The data was analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). The results revealed that there was a significant negative correlation between vulnerable More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Scarcity and Mental Health—Multiple Mediators of Sleep Quality and Life Satisfaction

    Na Liu, Yan Zhang, Junxiu Wang
    International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, Vol.26, No.6, pp. 449-462, 2024, DOI:10.32604/ijmhp.2024.049334
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Social Stress, Adversity, and Mental Health in Transitional China)
    Abstract Background: In the current social environment, scarcity, as a universally present objective state, profoundly impacts individuals’ decision-making and health through the subjective feeling it induces, known as a “scarcity mindset.” Particularly, the feeling of scarcity related to money and sleep time is not only widespread but also directly linked to an individual’s mental health. Purpose: This study aims to delve into the relationship between the feeling of scarcity and mental health, with a specific focus on the relationship between the feeling of money scarcity or sleep time scarcity and mental health, as well as the… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Associations between Social Media Use and Sleep Quality in China: Exploring the Mediating Role of Social Media Addiction

    Yijie Ye, Han Wang, Liujiang Ye, Hao Gao
    International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, Vol.26, No.5, pp. 361-376, 2024, DOI:10.32604/ijmhp.2024.049606
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Social Stress, Adversity, and Mental Health in Transitional China)
    Abstract Sleep quality is closely linked to people’s health, and during the COVID-19 pandemic, the sleep patterns of residents in China were notably poor. The lockdown in China led to an increase in social media use, prompting questions about its impact on sleep. Therefore, this study investigates the association between social media use and sleep quality among Chinese residents during the COVID-19 outbreak, highlighting the potential mediating role of social media addiction. Data were collected via questionnaires through a cross-sectional survey with 779 valid responses. Variance analysis was used to test for differences in social media… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    A Study on the Influence of Social Media Use on Psychological Anxiety among Young Women

    Tao Liu, Huiyin Shi, Chen Chen, Rong Fu
    International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, Vol.26, No.3, pp. 199-209, 2024, DOI:10.32604/ijmhp.2024.046303
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Social Stress, Adversity, and Mental Health in Transitional China)
    Abstract To explore the relationship between social influence, social comparison, clarity of self-concept, and psychological anxiety among young women during their usage of social networking sites, our study selected 338 young women aged 14–34 from the social site platforms of Little Red Book and Weibo for questionnaire surveys. The Passive Social Network Utilization Scale, Social Comparison Scale (SCS), Social Influence Questionnaire, Self-Concept Clarity Scale (SCCS), and Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) were employed to measure the subjects. Our results show that the frequency of passive social media use is positively related to the level of psychological… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Parental Educational Expectations, Academic Pressure, and Adolescent Mental Health: An Empirical Study Based on CEPS Survey Data

    Tao Xu, Fangqiang Zuo, Kai Zheng
    International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, Vol.26, No.2, pp. 93-103, 2024, DOI:10.32604/ijmhp.2023.043226
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Social Stress, Adversity, and Mental Health in Transitional China)
    Abstract Background: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between parental educational expectations and adolescent mental health problems, with academic pressure as a moderating variable. Methods: This study was based on the baseline data of the China Education Panel Survey, which was collected within one school year during 2013–2014. It included 19,958 samples from seventh and ninth graders, who ranged from 11 to 18 years old. After removing missing values and conducting relevant data processing, the effective sample size for analysis was 16344. The OLS (Ordinary Least Squares) multiple linear regression analysis was used to examine… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Reliability and Validity of Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale among Chinese Civil Servants

    Shulan Lei, Shujuan Wang, Zhuohong Zhu, Min Lu, Xinying Li, Yiming Shen, Jing Chen
    International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, Vol.26, No.1, pp. 61-67, 2024, DOI:10.32604/ijmhp.2023.045478
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Social Stress, Adversity, and Mental Health in Transitional China)
    Abstract The purpose of this study was to explore the reliability and validity of the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale (WEMWBS) among Chinese civil servants, thus establishing a useful tool for assessing the mental health of individuals in this occupation. The WEMWBS, Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), and Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) were administered to a sample of 2,624 civil servants (42.860 ± 9.690 years) in a city located within Shandong Province, China. The findings revealed significant differences between groups with high and low scores on each item of the WEMWBS (t = 48.127–78.308, all pMore >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Associations between Mental Health Outcomes and Adverse Childhood Experiences and Character Strengths among University Students in Southern China

    Yulan Yu, Rassamee Chotipanvithayakul, Hujiao Kuang, Wit Wichaidit, Chonghua Wan
    International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, Vol.25, No.12, pp. 1343-1351, 2023, DOI:10.32604/ijmhp.2023.043446
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Social Stress, Adversity, and Mental Health in Transitional China)
    Abstract Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) can negatively affect mental health, whereas character strengths seem to be positively correlated with mental health. Detailed information on the history of ACEs among university students in China and the extent which mental health is associated with ACEs and character strengths can contribute to the needed empirical evidence for relevant stakeholders. Objectives of this study are 1) to estimate the prevalence of ACEs among undergraduate students in Southern China; and 2) to assess the extent which mental health outcomes (positive growth, well-being, and depression) are associated with ACEs and character strengths… More >

  • Open Access

    REVIEW

    Relationship between Parent-Child Attachment and Problem Behaviors among Chinese Firstborn Children in Family Transitions: A Meta-Analysis

    Cong Liu, Mohd Nazri Abdul Rahman, Nur Eva
    International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, Vol.25, No.11, pp. 1161-1172, 2023, DOI:10.32604/ijmhp.2023.030324
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Social Stress, Adversity, and Mental Health in Transitional China)
    Abstract The implementation of China’s three-child fertility policy has led to a notable increase in multiple-child families. Notably, firstborn children experience a significant transition from being an only child to a non-only child. This transition is associated with problematic behaviors, affecting their social adjustment, sibling relationships, and family harmony. Although several studies have examined the relationship between parent-child attachment and problem behaviors exhibited by firstborn children during family transitions, the findings have been inconsistent. Hence, a meta-analytic study was undertaken to elucidate the inconsistencies in this relationship and explore the moderating factors that may contribute to… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Who Is More Vulnerable? The Age-Period-Cohort Effect of Psychological Distress among Urban Residents in China

    Wenbin Wang, Yang Cao
    International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, Vol.25, No.10, pp. 1127-1136, 2023, DOI:10.32604/ijmhp.2023.030315
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Social Stress, Adversity, and Mental Health in Transitional China)
    Abstract How does psychological distress evolve over time? This study utilizes cross-sectional data from the China General Social Survey from 2010 to 2017 to explore the differences in psychological distress among Chinese residents at various ages, periods, and cohorts. The dummy variable method and random effects hierarchical age-period-cohort model were employed to isolate the age, period, and cohort effects that impacted the psychological distress of Chinese urban residents. First, in terms of the age effect, the psychological distress experienced by residents tends to increase initially and then decrease with age. Middle-aged individuals, around 40 years old,… More >

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