Home / Journals / MCB / Vol.11, No.4, 2014
Table of Content
  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Fluid Structure Modelling of Blood Flow in Vessels

    M. Moatamedi, M. Souli, E. Al-Bahkali
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.11, No.4, pp. 221-234, 2014, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2014.011.221
    Abstract This paper describes the capabilities of fluid structure interaction based multi-physics numerical modelling in solving problems related to vascular biomechanics. In this research work, the onset of a pressure pulse was simulated at the entrance of a three dimensional straight segment of the blood vessel like circular tube and the resulting dynamic response in the form of a propagating pulse wave through the wall was analysed and compared. Good agreement was found between the numerical results and the theoretical description of an idealized artery. Work has also been done on implementing the material constitutive models specific for vascular applications. More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Optimal Mass Distribution Prediction for Human Proximal Femur with Bi-modulus Property

    Jiao Shi, Kun Cai, Qing H. Qin†,‡
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.11, No.4, pp. 235-248, 2014, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2014.011.235
    Abstract Simulation of the mass distribution in a human proximal femur is important to provide a reasonable therapy scheme for a patient with osteoporosis. An algorithm is developed for prediction of optimal mass distribution in a human proximal femur under a given loading environment. In this algorithm, the bone material is assumed to be bi-modulus, i.e., the tension modulus is not identical to the compression modulus in the same direction. With this bi-modulus bone material, a topology optimization method, i.e., modified SIMP approach, is employed to determine the optimal mass distribution in a proximal femur. The effects of the difference between… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Additive Manufacturing of Anatomical Models from Computed Tomography Scan Data

    Y. Gür*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.11, No.4, pp. 249-258, 2014, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2014.011.249
    Abstract The purpose of the study presented here was to investigate the manufacturability of human anatomical models from Computed Tomography (CT) scan data via a 3D desktop printer which uses fused deposition modelling (FDM) technology. First, Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) CT scan data were converted to 3D Standard Triangle Language (STL) format by using InVaselius digital imaging program. Once this STL file is obtained, a 3D physical version of the anatomical model can be fabricated by a desktop 3D FDM printer. As a case study, a patient’s skull CT scan data was considered, and a tangible version of… More >

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