Home / Journals / MCB / Vol.1, No.3, 2004
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  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Nonlinear Elastic and Viscoelastic Deformation of the Human Red Blood Cell with Optical Tweezers

    J. P. Mills1,1, L. Qie2,2, M. Dao1,1, C. T. Lim2,2, S. Suresh1,3
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.1, No.3, pp. 169-180, 2004, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2004.001.169
    Abstract Studies of the deformation characteristics of single biological cells can offer insights into the connections among mechanical state, biochemical response and the onset and progression of diseases. Deformation imposed by optical tweezers provides a useful means for the study of single cell mechanics under a variety of well-controlled stress-states. In this paper, we first critically review recent advances in the study of single cell mechanics employing the optical tweezers method, and assess its significance and limitations in comparison to other experimental tools. We then present new experimental and computational results on shape evolution, force--extension curves, elastic properties and viscoelastic response… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    An Improved Mathematical Approach for Determination of Molecular Kinetics in Living Cells with FRAP

    Tanmay Lele1,1, Philmo Oh1,1, Jeffrey A. Nickerson1,1,2,2, Donald E. Ingber1,1,3,3
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.1, No.3, pp. 181-190, 2004, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2004.001.181
    Abstract The estimation of binding constants and diffusion coefficients of molecules that associate with insoluble molecular scaffolds inside living cells and nuclei has been facilitated by the use of Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP) in conjunction with mathematical modeling. A critical feature unique to FRAP experiments that has been overlooked by past mathematical treatments is the existence of an `equilibrium constraint': local dynamic equilibrium is not disturbed because photobleaching does not functionally destroy molecules, and hence binding-unbinding proceeds at equilibrium rates. Here we describe an improved mathematical formulation under the equilibrium constraint which provides a more accurate estimate of molecular reaction… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Determination of membrane tension during balloon distension of intestine

    H. Gregersen1, G.S. Kassab2, Y.C. Fung2
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.1, No.3, pp. 191-200, 2004, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2004.001.191
    Abstract During the last decades, it has become increasingly common to make balloons distension in visceral organs in vivo. In particular this is true for studies of gastrointestinal motor function and biomechanics. Balloon distension is often used for assessment of small intestinal compliance and tension based on Laplace's law for cylindrical pressure pipes. This commonly used law is valid only when the balloon-distended intestine is cylindrical. Experimentally, it is seen that the diameter of the balloon-distended intestine is not a constant, but variable in the axial direction. Hence, it is necessary to improve Laplace's law for intestinal investigation. In this paper… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    On the Molecular Basis for Mechanotransduction

    Roger D. Kamm1,1,2,2, Mohammad R. Kaazempur-Mofrad1,1
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.1, No.3, pp. 201-210, 2004, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2004.001.201
    Abstract Much is currently known about the signaling pathways that are excited when cells are subjected to a mechanical stimulus, yet we understand little of the process by which the mechanical perturbation is transformed into a biochemical signal. Numerous theories have been proposed, and each has merit. While cells may possess many different ways of responding to stress, the existence of a single unifying principle has much appeal. Here we propose the hypothesis that cells sense mechanical force through changes in protein conformation, leading to altered binding affinities of proteins, ultimately initiating an intracellular signaling cascade or producing changes in the… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Cantilever Arrays for Multiplexed Mechanical Analysis of Biomolecular Reactions

    Min Yue1,1, Jeanne C. Stachowiak1,1,2,2, Arunava Majumdar1,1,3,3
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.1, No.3, pp. 211-220, 2004, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2004.001.211
    Abstract Microchips;ontaining arrays of cantilever beams have been used to mechanically detect and quantitatively analyze multiple reactions of DNA hybridization and antigen-antibody binding simultaneously. The reaction-induced deflection of a cantilever beam reflects the interplay between strain energy increase of the beam and the free energy reduction of a reaction, providing an ideal tool for investigating the connection between mechanics and chemistry of biomolecular reactions. Since free energy reduction is common for all reactions, the cantilever array forms a universal platform for label-free detection of various specific biomolecular reactions. A few such reactions and their implications in biology and biotechnology are discussed. More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Flow dynamics in Models of Intracranial Terminal Aneurysms

    Alvaro Valencia1
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.1, No.3, pp. 221-232, 2004, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2004.001.221
    Abstract Flow dynamics play an important role in the pathogenesis and treatment of intracranial aneurysms. The evaluation of the velocity field in the aneurysm dome and neck is important for the correct placement of endovascular coils, and the temporal and spatial variations of wall shear stress in the aneurysm are correlated with its growth and rupture. This numerical investigation describes the hemodynamic in two models of terminal aneurysm of the basilar artery. Aneurysm models with a aspect ratio of 1.0 and 1.67 were studied. Each model was subject to physiological representative waveform of inflow for a mean Reynolds number of 560.… More >

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