Home / Journals / MCB / Vol.2, No.3, 2005
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  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    On the Inaugural of MCB: Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics

    X. Edward Guo1, Gang Bao1
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.2, No.3, pp. 87-88, 2005, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2005.002.087
    Abstract This article has no abstract. More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Collaboration between GEM4 and MCB

    X. Edward Guo1, Gang Bao1
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.2, No.3, pp. 89-90, 2005, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2005.002.089
    Abstract This article has no abstract. More >

  • Open Access

    REVIEW

    Catch Bonds: Physical Models and Biological Functions

    Cheng Zhu1, Rodger P. McEver2
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.2, No.3, pp. 91-104, 2005, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2005.002.091
    Abstract Force can shorten the lifetimes of receptor-ligand bonds by accelerating their dissociation. Perhaps paradoxical at first glance, bond lifetimes can also be prolonged by force. This counterintuitive behavior was named catch bonds, which is in contrast to the ordinary slip bonds that describe the intuitive behavior of lifetimes being shortened by force. Fifteen years after their theoretical proposal, catch bonds have finally been observed. In this article we review recently published data that have demonstrated catch bonds in the selectin system and suggested catch bonds in other systems, the theoretical models for their explanations, and their function as a mechanism… More >

  • Open Access

    REVIEW

    Biophysical approaches for studying the integrity and function of tight junctions

    S.R.K. Vedula1, T.S. Lim2, P.J. Kausalya3, W. Hunziker3, G. Rajagopal2, C.T. Lim1,4
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.2, No.3, pp. 105-124, 2005, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2005.002.105
    Abstract Cell-cell adhesion is an extremely important phenomenon as it influences several biologically important processes such as inflammation, cell migration, proliferation, differentiation and even cancer metastasis. Furthermore, proteins involved in cell-cell adhesion are also important from the perspective of facilitating better drug delivery across epithelia. The adhesion forces imparted by proteins involved in cell-cell adhesion have been the focus of research for sometime. However, with the advent of nanotechnological techniques such as the atomic force microscopy (AFM), we can now quantitatively probe these adhesion forces not only at the cellular but also molecular level. Here, we review the structure and function… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Evaluation of Tension in Actin Bundle of Endothelial Cells Based on Preexisting Strain and Tensile Properties Measurements

    S. Deguchi1,2, T. Ohashi2, M. Sato2
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.2, No.3, pp. 125-134, 2005, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2005.002.125
    Abstract Actin bundles in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) play a critical role in transmitting intracellular forces between separate focal adhesion sites. However, quantitative descriptions of tension level in single actin bundles in a physiological condition are still poorly studied. Here, we evaluated magnitude of preexisting tension in a single actin bundle of ECs on the basis of measurements of its preexisting stretching strain and tensile properties. Cultured ECs expressing fluorescently-labeled actin were treated with detergents to extract acin bundles. One end of an actin bundle was then dislodged from the substrate by using a microneedle, resulting in a shortening of the… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Control of the Direction of Lamellipodia Extension through Changes in the Balance between Rac and Rho Activities

    A.L. Brock, D.E. Ingber1
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.2, No.3, pp. 135-144, 2005, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2005.002.135
    Abstract The direction in which cells extend new motile processes, such as lamellipodia and filopodia, can be controlled by altering the geometry of extracellular matrix adhesive islands on which individual cells are cultured, thereby altering mechanical interactions between cells and the adhesive substrate [Parker (2002)]. Here we specifically investigate the intracellular molecular signals that mediate the mechanism by which cells selectively extend these processes from the corners of polygonal-shaped adhesive islands. Constitutive activation of the small GTPase Rac within cells cultured on square-shaped islands of fibronectin resulted in the elimination of preferential extension from corners. This loss of directionality was accompanied… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Melanoma Cell Extravasation under Flow Conditions Is Modulated by Leukocytes and Endogenously Produced Interleukin 8

    Cheng Dong1,2,3, Margaret J. Slattery2,3, Shile Liang3, Hsin-Hsin Peng2
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.2, No.3, pp. 145-160, 2005, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2005.002.145
    Abstract Attachment of tumor cells to the endothelium (EC) under flow conditions is critical for the migration of tumor cells out of the vascular system to establish metastases. Innate immune system processes can potentially promote tumor progression through inflammation dependant mechanisms.\nobreakspace {} White blood cells, neutrophils (PMN) in particular, are being studied to better understand how the host immune system affects cancer cell adhesion and subsequent migration and metastasis. Melanoma cell interaction with the EC is distinct from PMN-EC adhesion in the circulation. We found PMN increased melanoma cell extravasation, which involved initial PMN tethering on the EC, subsequent PMN capture… More >

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