Home / Journals / MCB / Vol.6, No.4, 2009
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  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    On the Origins of the Universal Dynamics of Endogenous Granules in Mammalian Cells

    Siva A. Vanapalli∗,†, Yixuan Li, Frieder Mugele, Michel H. G. Duits
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.6, No.4, pp. 191-202, 2009, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2009.006.191
    Abstract Endogenous granules (EGs) that consist of lipid droplets and mitochondria have been commonly used to assess intracellular mechanical properties via multiple particle tracking microrheology (MPTM). Despite their widespread use, the nature of interaction of EGs with the cytoskeletal network and the type of forces driving their dynamics - both of which are crucial for the interpretation of the results from MPTM technique - are yet to be resolved. In this report, we study the dynamics of endogenous granules in mammalian cells using particle tracking methods. We find that the ensemble dynamics of EGs is diffusive in three types of mammalian… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Biomechanical Aspects of Compliant Airways due to Mechanical Ventilation

    Kittisak Koombua*, Ramana M. Pidaparti∗,†,‡, P. Worth Longest∗,‡, Kevin R. Ward‡,§
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.6, No.4, pp. 203-216, 2009, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2009.006.203
    Abstract Without proper knowledge of mechanical ventilation effects, physicians can aggravate an existing lung injury. A better understanding of the interaction between airflow and airway tissue during mechanical ventilation will be helpful to physicians so that they can provide appropriate ventilator parameters for intubated patients. In this study, a computational model incorporating the interactions between airflow and airway walls was developed to investigate the effects of airway tissue flexibility on airway pressure and stress. Two flow rates, 30 and 60 l/min, from mechanical ventilation were considered. The transient waveform was active inhalation with a constant flow rate and passive exhalation. Results… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    In vitro Response of the Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Seeded in a Type-I Collagen-Glycosaminoglycan Scaffold for Skin Wound Repair Under the Mechanical Loading Condition

    Masanori Kobayashi, Myron Spector
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.6, No.4, pp. 217-228, 2009, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2009.006.217
    Abstract In order to achieve successful wound repair by regenerative tissue engineering using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), it is important to understand the response of stem cells in the scaffold matrix to mechanical stress.
    To investigate the clinical effects of mechanical stress on the behavior of cells in scaffolds, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were grown on a type-I collagen-glycosaminoglycan (GAG) scaffold matrix for one week under cyclic stretching loading conditions.
    The porous collagen-GAG scaffold matrix for skin wound repair was prepared, the harvested canine MSCs were seeded on the scaffold, and cultured under three kinds of cyclic… More >

  • Open Access

    REVIEW

    Molecular Basis of Force Development by Skeletal Muscles During and After Stretch

    Dilson E. Rassier*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.6, No.4, pp. 229-242, 2009, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2009.006.229
    Abstract When activated skeletal muscles are stretched at slow velocities, force increases in two phases: (i) a fast increase, and (ii) a slow increase. The transition between these phases is commonly associated with the mechanical detachment of cross-bridges from actin. This phenomenon is referred to asforce enhancement during stretch. After the stretch, force decreases and reaches steady-state at levels that are higher than the force produced at the corresponding length during purely isometric contractions. This phenomenon is referred to asresidual force enhancement.The mechanisms behind the increase in force during and after stretch are still a matter of debate, and have physiological… More >

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