Home / Journals / MCB / Vol.1, No.1, 2004
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  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Yuan-Cheng Fung : A Scientific Giant and a Kind Man

    Pin Tong1
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.1, No.1, pp. 1-4, 2004, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2004.001.001
    Abstract This article has no abstract. More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Y.C. "Bert'' Fung: The Father of Modern Biomechanics

    Ghassan S. Kassab1
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.1, No.1, pp. 5-22, 2004, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2004.001.005
    Abstract This article has no abstract. More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Engineering Nanostructured Probes for Sensitive Intracellular Gene Detection

    Gang Bao1, Andrew Tsourkas2, Philip J. Santangelo2
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.1, No.1, pp. 23-36, 2004, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2004.001.023
    Abstract The ability to detect, localize, quantify and monitor the expression of specific genes in living cells in real-time will offer unprecedented opportunities for advancement in molecular biology, disease pathophysiology, drug discovery, and medical diagnostics. However, current methods for quantifying gene expression employ either selective amplification (as in PCR) or saturation binding followed by removal of the excess probes (as in microarrays and in situ hybridization) to achieve specificity. Neither approach is applicable when detecting gene transcripts within living cells. Here we review the recent development in engineering nanostructured molecular probes for gene detection in vivo, describe probe design approaches and… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Flaw tolerant bulk and surface nanostructures of biological systems

    Huajian Gao1,1, Baohua Ji1,1, Markus J. Buehler1,1, Haimin Yao1,1
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.1, No.1, pp. 37-52, 2004, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2004.001.037
    Abstract Bone-like biological materials have achieved superior mechanical properties through hierarchical composite structures of mineral and protein. Gecko and many insects have evolved hierarchical surface structures to achieve extraordinary adhesion capabilities. We show that the nanometer scale plays a key role in allowing these biological systems to achieve their superior properties. We suggest that the principle of flaw tolerance may have had an overarching influence on the evolution of the bulk nanostructure of bone-like materials and the surface nanostructure of gecko-like animal species. We demonstrate that the nanoscale sizes allow the mineral nanoparticles in bone to achieve optimum fracture strength and… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    The Mechanochemical Basis of Cell and Tissue Regulation

    D.E. Ingber1
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.1, No.1, pp. 53-68, 2004, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2004.001.053
    Abstract This article is a summary of a lecture presented at a symposium on "Mechanics and Chemistry of Biosystems'' in honor of Professor Y.C. Fung that convened at the University of California, Irvine in February 2004. The article reviews work from our laboratory that focuses on the mechanism by which mechanical and chemical signals interplay to control how individual cells decide whether to grow, differentiate, move, or die, and thereby promote pattern formation during tissue morphogenesis. Pursuit of this challenge has required development and application of new microtechnologies, theoretical formulations, computational models and bioinformatics tools. These approaches have been used to… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    System Optimization for the Development of Ultrasensitive Electronic Biosensors Using Carbon Nanotube Nanoelectrode Arrays

    Jessica E. Koehne, Jun Li1, Alan M. Cassell, Hua Chen, Qi Ye, Jie Han, M. Meyyappan
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.1, No.1, pp. 69-80, 2004, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2004.001.069
    Abstract Vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been reported in fabricating nanoelectrode arrays. Further studies on optimizing this system for the development of ultrasensitive DNA sensors are reported here. The mechanical stability of the as-grown MWCNT array can be improved by polymer coating or SiO2 encapsulation. The latter method provides excellent electronic and ionic insulation to the sidewall of MWCNTs and the underlying metal layer, which is investigated with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The insulation ensures well-defined nanoelectrode behavior. A method is developed for selectively functionalizing biomolecules at the open end of MWCNTs while keeping the SiO2 surface passivated, using the… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Fixed Electrical Charges and Mobile Ions Affect the Measurable Mechano-Electrochemical Properties of Charged-Hydrated Biological Tissues: The Articular Cartilage Paradigm

    Leo Q. Wan1,1, Chester Miller1,1, X. Edward Guo2,2, Van C. Mow1,1,3,3
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.1, No.1, pp. 81-100, 2004, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2004.001.081
    Abstract The triphasic constitutive law [Lai, Hou and Mow (1991)] has been shown in some special 1D cases to successfully model the deformational and transport behaviors of charged-hydrated, porous-permeable, soft biological tissues, as typified by articular cartilage. Due to nonlinearities and other mathematical complexities of these equations, few problems for the deformation of such materials have ever been solved analytically. Using a perturbation procedure, we have linearized the triphasic equations with respect to a small imposed axial compressive strain, and obtained an equilibrium solution, as well as a short-time boundary layer solution for the mechano- electrochemical (MEC) fields for such a… More >

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