Home / Journals / MCB / Vol.5, No.3, 2008
Table of Content
  • Open Access

    REVIEW

    Blast Related Neurotrauma: A review of Cellular Injury

    Lai Yee Leung*, Pamela J. VandeVord∗,†, Alessandra Leonardi Dal Cengio*, Cynthia Bir*, King H. Yang*, Albert I. King*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.5, No.3, pp. 155-168, 2008, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2008.005.155
    Abstract Historically, blast overpressure is known to affect primarily gas-containing organs such as the lung and ear. More recent interests focus on its ability to cause damage to solid organs such as the brain, resulting in neurological disorders. Returning veterans exposed to blast but without external injuries are being diagnosed with mild traumatic brain injury (Warden 2006) and with cortical dysfunction (Cernak et al 1999). Decades of studies have been conducted to elucidate the effects of primary blast wave on the central nervous system. These studies were mostly concerned with systemic effects (Saljo et al 2000-2003; Kaur et al 1995-1997, 1999;… More >

  • Open Access

    REVIEW

    Mechanistic Insights into the Physiological Functions of Cell Adhesion Proteins Using Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy

    Vedula S.R.K.*, Lim T.S., Hunziker W., Lim C.T.§
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.5, No.3, pp. 169-182, 2008, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2008.005.169
    Abstract Intercellular adhesion molecules play an important role in regulating several cellular processes such as a proliferation, migration and differentiation. They also play an important role in regulating solute diffusion across monolayers of cells. The adhesion characteristics of several intercellular adhesion molecules have been studied using various biochemical assays. However, the advent of single molecule force spectroscopy as a powerful tool to analyze the kinetics and strength of protein interactions has provided us with an opportunity to investigate these interactions at the level of a single molecule. The study of interactions involving intercellular adhesion molecules has gained importance because of the… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Role of Tissue Structure on Ventricular Wall Mechanics

    Benjamin A. Coppola*, Jeffrey H. Omens∗,†
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.5, No.3, pp. 183-196, 2008, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2008.005.183
    Abstract It is well known that systolic wall thickening in the inner half of the left ventricular (LV) wall is of greater magnitude than predicted by myofiber contraction alone. Previous studies have related the deformation of the LV wall to the orientation of the laminar architecture. Using this method, wall thickening can be interpreted as the sum of contributions due to extension, thickening, and shearing of the laminar sheets. We hypothesized that the thickening mechanics of the ventricular wall are determined by the structural organization of the underlying tissue, and may not be influenced by factors such as loading and activation… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Shear Deformation Kinematics During Cartilage Articulation: Effect of Lubrication, Degeneration, and Stress Relaxation

    Benjamin L. Wong*, Won C. Bae*, Kenneth R. Gratz*, Robert L. Sah∗,†
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.5, No.3, pp. 197-206, 2008, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2008.005.197
    Abstract During joint articulation, the biomechanical behavior of cartilage not only facilitates load-bearing and low-friction, but also provides regulatory cues to chondrocytes. Elucidation of cartilage kinematics under combined compression and shearing conditions clarifies these cues in health and disease. The objectives of this study were to elucidate the effects of lubricant, tissue degeneration, and stress relaxation duration on cartilage shear kinematics during articulation. Human osteochondral cores with normal and mildly degenerate surface structures were isolated. Paired blocks from each core were apposed, compressed, allowed to stress relax for 5 or 60 min, and shear tested with a micro-scale video microscopy system… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Fung's Model of Arterial Wall Enhanced with a Failure Description

    K.Y. Volokh *
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.5, No.3, pp. 207-216, 2008, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2008.005.207
    Abstract One of the seminal contributions of Y.C. Fung to biomechanics of soft tissue is the introduction of the models of arterial deformation based on the exponential stored energy functions, which are successfully used in various applications. The Fung energy functions, however, explain behavior of intact arteries and do not include a description of arterial failure. The latter is done in the present work where Fung's model is enhanced with a failure description. The description is based on the introduction of a limiter for the stored energy -- the average energy of chemical bonds, which can be interpreted as a failure… More >

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