Home / Journals / MCB / Vol.2, No.2, 2005
Table of Content
  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Remodeling of Strain Energy Function of Common Bile Duct post Obstruction

    Quang Dang1,1, Hans Gregersen2,2, Birgitte Duch2,2, Ghassan S. Kassab1,1
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.2, No.2, pp. 53-62, 2005, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2005.002.053
    Abstract Biliary duct obstruction is an important clinical condition that affects millions of people worldwide. We have previously shown that the common bile duct (CBD) undergoes significant growth and remodelling post obstruction. The mechanical stress-strain relation is expected to change due to growth and remodeling in response to obstruction and hence pressure-overload. The objective of the present study was to characterize the material properties of the CBD of the sham group and at 3 hours, 12 hours, 2 days, 8 days and 32 days (n=5 in each group) after obstruction. The Fung's exponential strain energy function was used to relate stress… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Interfacial Strength of Cement Lines in Human Cortical Bone

    X. Neil Dong1,2, Xiaohui Zhang1, X. Edward Guo1
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.2, No.2, pp. 63-68, 2005, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2005.002.063
    Abstract In human cortical bone, cement lines (or reversal lines) separate osteons from the interstitial bone tissue, which consists of remnants of primary lamellar bone or fragments of remodeled osteons. There have been experimental evidences of the cement line involvement in the failure process of bone such as fatigue and damage. However, there are almost no experimental data on interfacial properties of cement lines in human cortical bone. The objective of this study is to design and assemble a precision and computer controlled osteon pushout microtesting system, and to experimentally determine the interfacial strength of cement lines in human cortical bone… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Contractile Torque as a Steering Mechanism for Orientation of Adherent Cells

    Dimitrije Stamenovic´ 1
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.2, No.2, pp. 69-76, 2005, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2005.002.069
    Abstract It is well established that adherent cells change their orientation in response to non-uniform substrate stretching. Most observations indicate that cells orient away from the direction of the maximal substrate strain, whereas in some cases cells also align with the direction of the maximal strain. Previous studies suggest that orientation and steering of the cell may be closely tied to cytoskeletal contractile stress but they could not explain the mechanisms that direct cell reorientation. This led us to develop a simple, mechanistic theoretical model that could predict a direction of cell orientation in response to mechanical nonuniformities of the substrate.… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    On Eulerian Constitutive Equations for Modeling Growth and Residual Stresses in Arteries

    K.Y. Volokh1
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.2, No.2, pp. 77-86, 2005, DOI:10.3970/mcb.2005.002.077
    Abstract Recently Volokh and Lev (2005) argued that residual stresses could appear in growing arteries because of the arterial anisotropy. This conclusion emerged from a continuum mechanics theory of growth of soft biological tissues proposed by the authors. This theory included Lagrangian constitutive equations, which were formulated directly with respect to the reference configuration. Alternatively, it is possible to formulate Eulerian constitutive equations with respect to the current configuration and to 'pull them back' to the reference configuration. Such possibility is examined in the present work. The Eulerian formulation of the constitutive equations is used for a study of arterial growth.… More >

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