Special lssues
Table of Content

Nanocelluloses: Sources, Isolation, and Their Utilization

Submission Deadline: 30 October 2022 (closed)

Guest Editors

Suryadi Ismadji, Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering, Widya Mandala Surabaya Catholic University,Indonesia
Suryadi Ismadji is a professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering, Widya Mandala Surabaya Catholic University, Indonesia. He obtained his Ph.D. degree from The University of Queensland, Australia. Currently, Suryadi Ismadji has published 216 papers indexed by SCI and Scopus. Most of his papers deal with the valorization of waste biomass for various applications. He has an h-index of 48 (Scopus). Professor Suryadi also has 14 Indonesia patents.

Felycia Edi Soetaredjo, Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering, Widya Mandala Surabaya Catholic University, Indonesia
Felycia Edi Soetaredjo is a professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering, Widya Mandala Surabaya Catholic University, Indonesia. She obtained her Ph.D. degree from the National Taiwan University of Science and Technology. Currently, Felycia Edi Soetaredjo is a member of the Indonesia Academic of Science. She has published more than 120 papers indexed by SCI and Scopus. Her h-index is 22 (Scopus). Professor Felycia has 15 Indonesia patents.

Summary

Nanocelluloses are promising green and renewable materials for various applications in this modern era. They possess nanostructures that make them desirable materials for advances and emerging technologies. They are renewable and sustainable with excellent mechanical properties, which are biocompatible for biological applications. In general, nanocelluloses are present either in nanostructured materials or nanofibers.


Various lignocellulosic materials can be utilized for nanocelluloses preparation through different processes. The source or the origin of lignocellulosic materials, method of isolation, and processing parameters strongly influence the morphology and physical characteristic of nanocelluloses. The latter determines the application of nanocelluloses. One of the interesting topics for the researcher for nanocelluloses production is the source of lignocellulosic materials. The unexplored lignocellulosic materials are still abundantly available, and the nanostructure of the nanocelluloses produced can provide new frontiers for a wide variety of applications.


This special issue will cover a wide variety of nanocelluloses, from production until their utilization. The topics include but not limited to:


· Nanocelluloses from various biomasses

· Modification of nanocelluloses

· Nanocelluloses for drug deliveries

· Nanocelluloses in food

· Nanocelluloses for cosmetics

· Nanocelluloses for catalysts


Keywords

Nanocellulose; application; lignocellulosic; biomass; isolation

Published Papers


  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Effects of Cationic Surfactant on Fresh and Hardened Properties of Cement-Based Mortar

    Soumaya Zormati, Fadhel Aloulou, Habib Sammouda
    Journal of Renewable Materials, Vol.11, No.5, pp. 2345-2365, 2023, DOI:10.32604/jrm.2023.026170
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Nanocelluloses: Sources, Isolation, and Their Utilization)
    Abstract

    The objective of this study is to analyze the effects of using surfactant (CTAB) and cellulose nanofibers (NFC) as an admixture in cement mortars. We examined composite properties as porosity, compression energy, thermal conductivity and hydration. The results showed that with the addition of 0.7% by weight of NFC per emulsion in the presence of a cationic surfactant (CTAB). The new material produced presented a dry porosity between 4.7% and 4.4%, compressive strength between 9.8 and 22.9 MPa, and thermal conductivity between 0.95 and 2.25 W·m−1·K−1. Thus we show better mechanical and thermal performance than that

    More >

    Graphic Abstract

    Effects of Cationic Surfactant on Fresh and Hardened Properties of Cement-Based Mortar

Share Link