Home / Journals / MCB / Vol.16, Suppl.2, 2019
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  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    LOX Alleviates Rat Intervertebral Disc Degeneration Through ECM Improvement and Anti-Apoptotic Protection in Nucleus Pulposus Cells

    Runze Zhao1, Tingting Xia1, Mengyue Wang1, Fan Feng1, Wanqian Liu1,*, Li Yang1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 77-77, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07155
    Abstract This study was focus on the exploring the therapeutic function of lysyl oxidase (LOX) in rat nucleus pulposus (NP) cells in intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD). To do this, a Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat caudal spine degeneration model was established by puncturing the Co5-6 disc. NP cells apoptosis and extracellular matrix (ECM) degeneration in IVDD were evaluated by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), Hematoxylin-Eosin (H&E) and immunofluorescence. Then, the therapeutic effect of LOX on IVDD was evaluated by histological staining. In vitro, the regulator effect of LOX on degenerate rat NP cell was explored. ECM relate proteins and cytokines were… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Macrophages as A Mechano-Transducer to Direct the Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Lili Dong1, Yang Song1,*, Li Yang1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 78-78, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07130
    Abstract It has been widely recognized that stem cells possess the potential of osteogenic differentiation, which greatly contribute to bone repair. Recently, accumulating evidences have indicated that mechanical cues are required for bone repair [1,2]. However, how local and recruited stem cells in the bone architecture receive the mechanical signals is poorly understood [3,4]. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that macrophages potentially transduce the mechanical signals for stem cell osteogenic lineage. This demonstration has been carried out through a co-culture system to investigate the effect of macrophages which subjected to cyclic stretch on the osteogenic potential of bone… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Molecular and Cellular Immuno-Engineering

    Yingxiao Wang1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 79-79, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07268
    Abstract Genetically-encoded biosensors based on fluorescence proteins (FPs) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) have enabled the specific targeting and visualization of signaling events in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolutions. Single-molecule FRET biosensors have been successfully developed to monitor the activity of variety of signaling molecules, including tyrosine/serine/threonine kinases. We have a developed a general high-throughput screening (HTS) method based on directed evolution to develop sensitive and specific FRET biosensors. We have first applied a yeast library and screened for a mutated binding domain for phosphorylated peptide sequence. When this mutated binding domain and the peptide sequence are connected by… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Differential Organization of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells on Tubular Surface as A Novel Mechanobiology Mechanism of Airway Tissue Morphogenesis

    Linhong Deng1,*, Yang Jin2, Mingzhi Luo1
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 80-80, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07370
    Abstract Airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) exists within the bronchial airway wall in a form of spirally winding bundles [1]. This pattern emerges early during embryonic development and is involved in airway branching [2], providing the airway appropriate contractile capacity and resistance to circumferential tension in health or causing excessive airway narrowing in disease such as asthma. Despite its importance, the cause of ASMCs self-organization remains largely a mystery. Previously, we have demonstrated in 2D that ASMCs can sense the curvature in their microenvironment and change behaviors in differentiation, orientation and migration accordingly [3]. Here we further explore in 3D microenvironment… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Dependency of Nuclear Deformation of Smooth Muscle Cells on Tissue Stretch Direction May Explain Anisotropic Response of Aortic Wall to Hypertension

    Takeo Matsumoto1,*, Chizuru Hirooka1, Yong Fan1, Junfeng Wang1, Naoki Mori1, Eijiro Maeda1
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 81-81, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07102
    Abstract Aortic wall thickens in response to hypertension. Many studies reported that the wall thickening occurs to maintain the wall stress in the circumferential direction at a constant level. In case of the longitudinal direction, however, there are few studies suggesting the constancy of the stress. Such anisotropic response may be attributable to the circumferential alignment of the smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the wall [1]. However, to the authors’ knowledge, there are no study discussing the underlying mechanism of the anisotropic response. It has been reported that mechanical deformation of the nuclei causes transcription upregulation [2]. This might suggest that… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Engineering Zap70 Biosensor Through Directed Evolution for Applications in Single-Cell Imaging and Immunotherapy

    Longwei Liu1, Praopim Limsakul1, Shaoying (Kathy) Lu1, Peter Yingxiao Wang1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 82-82, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07360
    Abstract Genetically-encoded biosensors based on Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET biosensors) have been widely used to dynamically track the activity of Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) in living cells because of their sensitive ratiometric fluorescence readout, high spatiotemporal resolution. However, the limitation in sensitivity, specificity, and dynamic range of these biosensors have hindered their broader applications, and there was a lack of efficient ways to optimize FRET biosensors. Here we established a rapid, systematic and universal approach for FRET biosensor optimization through directed evolution which involves generating genetic diversity and screening for protein variants with desired properties at the same time and… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Histone Modification and Chromatin Reorganization Regulated by Mechanical Tension in Single Cell Mitosis

    Qin Peng1, Shaoying Lu1, Shu Chien1, Yingxiao Wang1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 83-83, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07385
    Abstract The dramatic re-organization of chromatin during mitosis is perhaps one of the most fundamental of all cell processes [1,2]. It remains unclear how epigenetic histone modifications, despite their crucial roles in regulating chromatin architectures, are dynamically coordinated with chromatin reorganization in controlling this process. Mechanical cues have also been shown to play important roles in modulating gene expressions and cellular functions [3,4]; however, it is still unclear about the mechanical regulations of epigenetics and chromatin organization. In this study, we have developed and characterized biosensors with high sensitivity and specificity based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). These biosensors were… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Role of Myocardial Contractions on Coronary Vasoactivity

    Xiao Lu1,*, Ghassan Kassab1
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 84-86, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07089
    Abstract This article has no abstract. More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    On the Onset of Cracks in Arteries

    Pullela Mythravaruni1, Konstantin Volokh1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 87-87, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07274
    Abstract We present a theoretical approach to study the onset of failure localization into cracks in arterial wall. The arterial wall is a soft composite comprising hydrated ground matrix of proteoglycans reinforced by spatially dispersed elastin and collagen fibers. As any material, the arterial tissue cannot accumulate and dissipate strain energy beyond a critical value. This critical value is enforced in the constitutive theory via energy limiters. The limiters automatically bound reachable stresses and allow examining the mathematical condition of strong ellipticity. Loss of the strong ellipticity physically means inability of material to propagate superimposed waves. The waves cannot propagate because… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Modeling Mechano-chemical Couplings in Bone Adaptation by Remodeling

    Taiji Adachi1,*, Yoshitaka Kameo1
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 88-88, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07417
    Abstract Bone adaptation by remodeling is a process to change its outer shape and internal structure to the changing mechanical environment by osteoclastic bone resorption and osteoblastic bone formation. These cellular activities are regulated by mechanosensory network of osteocytes embedded in bone matrix. An imbalance between bone resorption and formation due to low loadings or disuse results in metabolic bone disorders such as osteoporosis. Many studies have identified various signaling pathways that regulate these cellular activities; however, the physiological and pathological conditions of bone as a system remain difficult to understand because of the complexity of the signaling networks including mechano-biochemical… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Dynamics of Trabecular Meshwork Deformation under Pulsatile Intraocular Pressure

    Xiuqing Qian1,2, Fan yuan1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 89-89, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07041
    Abstract Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the most important risk factor for disease progression in glaucoma patients. The elevation is predominantly due to the increase in the aqueous outflow resistance in the trabecular outflow pathway. Recent data have shown that the resistance increase is correlated with changes in the tissue stiffness. To this end, we developed a mathematical model to simulate how the tissue stiffness can affect the deformation of the trabecular meshwork (TM) that can be determined experimentally. The goal of the study is to develop a method to non-invasively determine the TM stiffness in patients through measurement of the… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Kinematic and Dynamic Characteristics of Pulsating Flow in 180° Tube

    Tin-Kan Hung1,*, Ruei-Hung Kuo2, Cheng-Hsien Chiang3
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 90-91, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07854
    Abstract Pulsating flow in a human aortic arch is studied from its kinematic and dynamic characteristics of transient tubular boundary layer. The results can only be obtained by a 3D fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis for the rapidly accelerated and decelerated systolic flow. The flow is based on a prescribed inlet velocity, VO(t), which can be expressed as the instantaneous Reynolds number, Re(t) = ρDVO/μ in which D is the tube diameter, ρ the blood density and μ the dynamic viscosity. Computation of pressure field requires a reference pressure at the downstream end section. The pressure is based on the pulse in… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Mechanical Relaxation during Cell Reprogramming

    Yang Song1, Jennifer Soto1, Song Li1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 92-92, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07345
    Abstract Cell reprograming technologies have broad applications in cell therapy, disease modeling and drug screening. Direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into induced neuronal (iN) cells has been achieved via the forced expression of three transcription factors: Ascl1, Brn2 and Myt1l. Accumulative evidence suggests that biophysical factors in the microenvironment can regulate the epigenetic state and cell reprogramming. However, whether intracellular mechanical properties regulate cell reprogramming remains unknown. Here, we show for the first time, that the mechanical property of cells is modulated during the early phase of reprogramming as determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high-throughput quantitative deformability cytometry (q-DC). We… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Identification of Lysyl Oxidase on Repression of Inflammation for Promoting Anterior Cruciate Ligament Remodeling

    Yan Gao1, Chunli Wang1, Li Yang1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 93-93, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07322
    Abstract At present, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) damage repair is still a huge challenge. Our previous studies indicated that the Lysyl oxidase (LOX) were significantly reduced in injurious ACL fibroblasts, which is the major reason for its poor healing ability. The main purpose of our study was to detected the potential of LOX to act as an anabolic agent in injured ACL. The effect of LOX on the ACL at a concentration of 20ng/mL was investigated. The molecular mechanisms and signaling pathway were elucidated by RNA-sequencing, q-PCR and western blotting. For the in vivo study, the LOX was injected into the… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    hnRNPK a Possible Mechanosensitive Gene: Its Function in Chondrocytes and Osteoarthritis

    Lucy Wanjiru Njunge1, Andreanne Poppy Estania1, Li Yang1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 94-94, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07116
    Abstract Mechanical stimulation contributes to the development, homeostasis, integrity and functionality of the articular cartilage by modulating several cellular activities including production and remodeling of extracellular matrix (ECM), chondrocyte differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. On the other hand, abnormal mechanical strain play a critical role in osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis by inducing ECM degradation and chondrocyte apoptosis. Furthermore, deleterious mechanical loading can also stimulates the production of pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukin 1β (IL-1β) that promote to cartilage degradation, chondrocyte hypertrophy and inflammation [1]. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNPK), a member of the hnRNP family, is implicated in the expression, stabilization and organization… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Role of NFAT5 in Hypertonic Stress-Induced Atherosclerosis in Endothelium

    Pingping Ma1, Wanqian Liu1,*, Li Yang1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 95-95, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07363
    Abstract Globally, consumption of sodium (5.8 g per day) was far above the optimal levels (2.3 g per day). High intake of sodium was the leading dietary risk factor for deaths, which caused by cardiovascular disease [1]. Nevertheless, how high-salt intake leads to the occurrence of many cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis is still not very clear. Dmitrieva has reported that elevated sodium concentration promoted thrombogenesis by activating the signal pathway of NFAT5 (nuclear factor of activated T cells 5), a transcription factor which orchestrates cellular defense against osmotic stress [2]. Inflammatory is accompanied with the entire development process of atherosclerosis.… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Diabetes and Thrombosis: The Dark Side of the Force

    Lining Arnold Ju1,2,3,4,6,†,*, James McFadyen4,†, Saheb Al-Daher4,†, Imala Alwis1,2,3,4, Yunfeng Chen6,7,8, Mark E. Cooper9, Cheng Zhu1,2,3,5,6,7, Shaun P. Jackson1,2,3,4,8
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 96-96, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.06979
    Abstract Thrombotic diseases where platelets form clots and obstruct blood vessels remains the leading cause of death and disability in the world. Despite intense investigation over the last 40 years into the discovery and development of more effective drugs, less than 1 in 6 patients taking anti-thrombotic therapies avoid a fatal event. This situation is likely to worsen in younger generations due to the rapidly growing incidence of diabetes, which makes people more prone to thrombosis and resistant to existing anti-thrombotics with unknown reasons.
    To investigate this, I have developed the ‘Biomembrane Force Probe’ as the first-of-its-kind. This nanotool represents… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Fast Force Loading Disrupts Molecular Bond Stability in Human and Mouse Cell Adhesions

    Yunfeng Chen1,2,3,†,*, Jiexi Liao4,†, Zhou Yuan1, Kaitao Li4, Baoyu Liu4, Lining Arnold Ju4,5,6, Cheng Zhu1,2,4,5,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 97-97, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07123
    Abstract Force-mediated molecular binding initiates numerous cellular activities such as cell adhesion, migration, and activation. Dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) is widely used to examine molecular binding and cell mechano-signaling [1]. The rate of dissociation, off-rate, is an important attribute of molecular binding that reflects bond stability. Extensive DFS works have demonstrated that off-rates are a function of force magnitude, yielding signature bond behaviors like “catch bond” [2]. However, as a controversial topic of the field, different DFS assays, i.e., force-clamp and force-ramp assays, often yielded distinctive "off-rate vs. force" relations from the same molecular system [3]. Such discrepancies cast doubt on… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Atypical Activation of Endogenous Piezo1 Channels by Shear Stress in Endothelial Cells

    Jian Shi1,*, Baptiste Rode1, David Beech1
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 98-98, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.06939
    Abstract The sensing of blood flow-evoked shear stress is critical in vascular development and maintenance of a healthy vasculature in the adult [1,2]. The identity of molecules which sense and transduce this force into appropriate vascular anatomy and function is therefore keenly sought. A central question is whether there is a force sensor protein (“receptor”) which directly detects the force, acting either alone or in complex with other proteins. Piezo1 channels are Ca2+-permeable non-selective cationic channels which are activated by membrane stretch. These channels are important for shear stress-sensing and vascular function in embryonic and adult mice. Through whole-cell perforated patch… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    The Effect of Cellular Shape on Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    Yuhsuan Wang1,2, Yuwei Guo1,2, Lisha Zheng1,2,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 99-99, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.06995
    Abstract Many studies have shown that cell shape effects cell chromatin aggregation, gene expression, protein synthesis, cell growth, apoptosis, and cytoskeletal rearrangement [1, 2]. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are capable of osteogenic, dentinogenic, chondrogenic, and neurogenic differentiation. They are regarded as a promising candidate for tissue regeneration. How the cell shape regulates their cell behavior is still unknown. We used micropatterning technology to design single cell patterns in a 1:1, 1:2, 1:4, 1:8, 1:16 length-width ratio of rectangles with the same area. The results indicated that cell shape rearranged the cytoskeleton of DPSCs. The nuclear shape also affected by different… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    The Effect of Short-and Long-Term Simulated Microgravity on Immune Cells

    Sufang Wang1,2, Wenjuan Zhao1,2, Guolin Shi1,2, Nu Zhang1,2, Chen Zhang1,2, Hui Yang1,2,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 100-100, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07112
    Abstract Long-term space flight will be a major mission for International Space Administration. However, it has been shown that exposure to space flight result in immune system dysfunction. Therefore, understand the mechanism of immune response under microgravity condition is a key topic. Macrophage is one of the most important immune cells in human body, playing key roles in both innate and adaptive immune systems. In this research, we used mouse macrophages (RAW264.7) and collected samples at short-term (8 hour), mediate-term (24 hour) and long-term (48 hour) microgravity treatment. We measured cell proliferation, phagocytosis function and used next-generation sequencing (NGS) to obtain… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Contour-Based Data Analysis: Loading Rate Dependence in Dynamic Catch of Integrin-Ligand Bonds

    Xueyi Yang1, Yue Xu1, Chun Yang1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 101-101, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07117
    Abstract Cell-matrix interactions guide various cell behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, etc. Integrins, as a known transmembrane mechanosensor, undergo conformational changes in response to mechanical stimuli, and manipulate cell-matrix chemical-mechanical coupled signaling transduction [1]. The integrin-ligand bond kinetics has gain increasing attention among researchers. Independent studies showed that the integrin-ligand bond has been reported to be reinforced by the applied force f, while the loading rate df/dt had little effect on the bond lifetime [2].
    We previously observed a dramatic increase in bond lifetime beyond a loading rate threshold for the integrin α2β1-DGEA bond, by introducing AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy)… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    From Biomechanics to Molecular Affinity to Systems Immunology – My Path in Biomedical Engineering That is Inspired by Dr. YC Fung

    Ning Jiang1,2,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 102-102, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07486
    Abstract Force is not only involved in motion, but also involved in molecular interactions that guide cells to execute important physiological functions. Getting to know Dr. Fung at an early age shaped my college major decision, which lead me into the field of biomedical engineering. Applying a force-based measurement tool to study T cell receptor interaction with ligands in graduate school prepared me to use technology development as a foundation to answer important biological and clinical questions.
    By combining engineering principle, quantitative modeling, and a deep understanding of biology and medicine, my current research focuses in systems immunology and immune… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    The Dependence of Diffusio-Phoretic Mobility and Aggregation Properties of Proteins on Intermolecular Interaction in Confined System

    Jiachen Wei1,2,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 103-104, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07721
    Abstract Phoretic flow can be generated by different types of gradient (e.g. temperature, concentration, or charge gradient) [1-3]. Within micro-to-nano confined system, the diffusio-phoretic property for proteins differs dramatically from that obtained in bulk condition, due to concentration fluctuation that emerges at microscopic level induced by specific and nonspecific interactions between protein and co-solute [4-5]. The phoretic mobility of protein individuals and complex in solute gradients can be theoretically described by continuum model [1-2] that neglects microscopic heterogeneity and determined experimentally by microfluidics [6], but the underlying mechanism of diffusio-phoretic motion for confined protein still remains unclear.
    Our approach to… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Mapping Single Platelet Forces Directly by Fluorescence Imaging

    Yongliang Wang1, Dana N LeVine2, Xuefeng Wang1,3,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 105-105, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07872
    Abstract Platelets are important blood cells mediating hemostasis and thrombosis. Integrin tension plays a critical role in most platelet functions, such as adhesion, activation, aggregation and contraction. Visualizing and measuring single platelet forces are desired in both research and diagnosis of platelet functions. Here we developed integrative tension sensor (ITS) which converts integrin molecular tension to fluorescent signal, therefore enabling cellular force mapping directly by fluorescence imaging. With the ITS, we mapped integrin-transmitted platelet force at 0.4 µm resolution during platelet adhesion and contraction. We found that platelet force distribution has strong polarization which is sensitive to treatment with anti-platelet drugs,… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Extracellular Matrix Elasticity Gives Integrin a Sweet Change via a p53/miRNA-532/atp2c1 Axis

    Yan Zu1,2, Qiang Li1, Chun Yang2,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 106-106, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07132
    Abstract Extracellular matrix (ECM) elasticity affects the function of a variety of cells. Integrins are transmembrane receptors that considered to be a sensor of cellular mechanical stimulation. The activity of integrins is strongly influenced by glycans through glycosylation events and the establishment of glycan-mediated interactions. Our study found that the level of β1 integrin N-linked glycosylation was significantly down-regulated on softer ECM. Further, sialic acid is a common monosaccharide modified at the end of the sugar chain during N-glycosylation. We subjected the enriched sialylated glycoproteins to gel-based proteomic identification by tandem mass spectrometry and found that the chondrocytes seeded on stiff… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    In Vitro Studies of the Synergy Between Mechanical Loading and Genetics Within Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Micro-Scale Engineered Heart Tissues

    Nathaniel Huebsch1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 107-108, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.08524
    Abstract This article has no abstract. More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Ultra-stable Biomembrane Force Probe to Characterize Strong Protein-Protein Interactions on a Living Cell

    Chenyi An1, Wei Chen2,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 109-110, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07634
    Abstract Biomembrane force probe (BFP) is a single-molecule biomechanical technique that has been widely used to characterize protein dynamics (e.g., protein-protein interactions and protein conformational changes), especially suitable for measuring force-regulated receptor-ligand binding kinetics in situ[1-4]. Integrated with various force spectroscopies, such as lifetime assay, it has become a powerful platform to systematically characterize many force-regulated receptor-ligand dissociation of great biological significance, which cannot be done with traditional solution based assays (e.g., surface plasma resonance) [5].
    Even though the BFP has been quite successful in characterizing binding kinetics of weak and transient molecular interactions, it is still incapable of stably… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Magnetic Resonance Image-Based Modeling for Neurosurgical Interventions

    Yongqiang Li1,#, Changxin Lai1,#, Chengchen Zhang2, Alexa Singer1, Suhao Qiu1, Boming Sun2, Michael S. Sacks3, Yuan Feng1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 111-111, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07098
    Abstract Surgeries such as implantation of deep brain stimulation devices require accurate placement of devices within the brain. Because placement affects performance, image guidance and robotic assistance techniques have been widely adopted. These methods require accurate prediction of brain deformation during and following implantation. In this study, a magnetic resonance (MR) image-based finite element (FE) model was proposed by using a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian method. Anatomical accuracy was achieved by mapping image voxels directly to the volumetric mesh space. The potential utility was demonstrated by evaluating the effect of different surgical approaches on the deformation of the corpus callosum (CC) region. The… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Finite Element Modelling Predicts Large Accommodation Induced Optic Nerve Head Deformations

    Xiaofei Wang1,2,*, Yubo Fan1,2
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 112-112, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07053
    Abstract Accommodation is the ability of the eye to adjust its lens thickness to alter the refractive power through the contraction of ciliary muscles. The loss of accommodation ability due to aging leads to presbyopia, a condition in which the eye is unable to focus on near objects. Glaucoma is a disease that vision is impaired due to damage of the retinal ganglion cell at the optic nerve head (ONH) region, which is the leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. The biomechanical theory of glaucoma suggests that the deformations of ONH tissues could (directly or indirectly) drive retinal ganglion cell death.… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Effects of Muscle Fatigue on the Kinect Control of Free Throw in the Wheelchair Basketball Sport

    Hsiang-Wen Huang1, Ting-Wei Kuo1, Chi-Long Lee1, Yan-Ting Lin1, Yan-Ying Ju2, Chih-Hsiu Cheng1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 113-115, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07509
    Abstract Wheelchair basketball is mainly designed for people who are physically challenged with permanent lower body disabilities. Free throw execution is one of the basic skills and could represent the preferred shooting mechanics so as to examine the overall shooting mechanics in basketball players. It requires the body to act as a kinetic chain to summate energy from the wheelchair to the upper extremity for the coordinated movements. Researchers have shown that the kinetic chain of the wheelchair basketball athletes could be affected by the kinematic parameters such as the release velocity and shooting angle [1-3]. The goal of this study… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Immediate Negative Effects of Marathon Running on Overweight People’s Knee Articular Cartilage – A Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Relaxation Time Analysis

    Zhongzheng Wang1,2, Fei Tian3, Shaobai Wang3, Songtao Ai2, Tsung-Yuan Tsai1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 116-117, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07690
    Abstract This article has no abstract. More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Effect of Icariin on Osteoarthritis Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes: An In Vitro Study

    Lianhong Pan1, Li Yang2,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 118-118, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07133
    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic joint bone disease which always leads to the dysfunction and disability of arthritis. Synovial inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis and progress of OA which can secrete large amounts of inflammatory cytokines. There is an urgent need to find safe and effective drugs that can reduce the inflammation and regulate the pathogenesis of cytokines of the OA disease. Icariin, a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, is the major pharmacological active component of herb Epimedium. This study we investigated the influence of icariin on the main cells in synovium-osteoarthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes (OA-FLSs). The OA-FLSs were… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Identification of Btg2 As A Mechanosensitive Gene by Functional Screening Integrative Analyses

    Yao Guo1, Yijiang Song2, Yu Zhang1, Li Yang1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 119-119, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07134
    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA), with its high disability and mortality rate, is the most common arthritis throughout the world [1]. Exposure of articular cartilage to excessive mechanical stress is deeply involved in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) [2,3]. However, the mechanism of how mechanical stress causes cartilage degradation is not clear yet. Here we report that bioinformatics-based integrative analyses can assist in the study of mechanisms modulated by mechanical stress within OA pathology, and we reveal that B-cell Translocation Gene 2 (BTG2) can be a mechanosensitive gene involved in OA development. We obtained OA-associated differentially expressed genes from human and rat datasets… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Assessment of the Locomotion and the Long-term Efficacy of Biomechanics Foot Orthotic for the Subjects with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Chien-Chi Liu1, Sai-Wei Yang1,*, Tsui-Fen Yang2
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 120-122, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07150
    Abstract Scoliosis is the most common type of spinal deformity of the young adults, and women outnumber men about 10:1 [1], in which the Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) is up to 90% for ages 10 to 16year-old teenagers [2]. Studies revealed that due to the 3-dimensional musculoskeletal deformities, the AIS subjects to the dynamic postural instability including vestibular and proprioception disorders [3-5]. Dynamic postural Balance is monitored by integration of cortical modulation and somatosensory response [6], and the either motor or sensory impairment lead to balance dysfunction as well as pathologic gait. Studies revealed that the biomechanics functional foot orthotics can… More >

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    ABSTRACT

    Difference in Dynamic Gait Stability Between Sides in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Meng-Wei Lin1, Feng Yang1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 123-124, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07343
    Abstract This article has no abstract. More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Multifrequency Microwave Imaging for Brain Stroke Detection

    Lulu Wang1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 125-125, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07101
    Abstract Early diagnosis of stroke with timely treatment could reduce adult permanent disability significantly [1]. Conventional medical imaging tools such as X-ray, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been widely used for diagnosis of brain disease. However, each of these methods has some limitations. X-ray imaging produces harmful radiation to the human body and challenging to identify early-stage abnormal tissue due to the relatively small dielectric proprieties contrast between the healthy tissue and abnormal tissue at X-ray frequencies [2]. PET provides useful information about soft tissues, but it is expensive and produces poor… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Quantitative Method for Biomechanical Evaluation of Bedding Comfortableness

    Akisue Kuramoto1,*, Hitoshi Kimura2, Norio Inou2
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 126-126, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.08127
    Abstract Comfortable bedding is usually designed subjectively because of the difficulty in performing a quantitative evaluation. This paper proposes a quantitative evaluation method of comfortableness of beddings. The bedding shape determining how comfortable an individual may feel in using it depends on the body shape and normal posture of individuals. The internal physical load is expected to relate to the comfortableness of bedding. However, only a few quantitative discussions exist on the relation between the comfortableness of bedding and physical load. This study proposes a new evaluation method of physical load in a relaxed posture. The strain energy of muscles and… More >

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    ABSTRACT

    Matrix Stiffness Promotes Hepatoma Cell Glycolysis and Migration Through YAP-Mediated Mechanotransduction

    Qiuping Liu1, Guanbin Song1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 127-127, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07105
    Abstract Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most prevalent and lethal malignancies worldwide. Increased matrix stiffness of extracellular matrix (ECM) is commonly associated with HCC. During tumour formation and expansion, increasing glucose metabolism is necessary for unrestricted growth of tumour cells. Yet, the correlation between matrix stiffness and glucose metabolism in the development of HCC remains unknown. In this study, we aim to investigate the effect of matrix stiffness on glucose metabolism and migration of MHCC97L and HepG2 hepatoma cells, and explore the mechanotransduction involved in this process. Polyacrylamide hydrogels with stiffness gradients of 6, 25, 54 kPa were produced… More >

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    ABSTRACT

    Does Contemporary Bicruciate Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty Restore the Native Knee Kinematics? A Systematic Review of In-vitro Cadaveric Investigations.

    Yun Peng1, Guoan Li1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 128-129, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07392
    Abstract This article has no abstract. More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Effects of Three-Dimensional Stiffness on the Proliferation, Stemness And Invasion of Hepatic Cancer Stem Cells

    Mengyue Wang1, Runze Zhao1, Fan Feng1, Tingting Xia1,*, Li Yang1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 130-130, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07154
    Abstract Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third most common cancer in the world. Previous studies have shown that hard matrix promotes the proliferation of liver tumor cells. However, the role of matrix stiffness on hepatic cancer stem cells (HCSCs) is still unclear. Three-dimensional hydrogels with different stiffness were used to mimic the normal liver tissue (4kPa) and cancerous liver tissue (26kPa) stiffness. The proliferation, stemness and invasion properties of HCSCs under 3D different stiffness were detected. METHOD: HSCSs were screened and cultured by enrichment method, and the effect of matrix stiffness on HCSCs was studied by three-dimensional culture of HCSCs in… More >

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    ABSTRACT

    Gene Expression Profiling of Human Hepatocytes Grown on Differing Substrate Stiffness

    Fan Feng1, Tingting Xia1, Runze Zhao1, Mengyue Wang1, Li Yang1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 131-131, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07211
    Abstract Objective: To study the effects of different substrate stiffness on human hepatocytes using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology. The stiffness was corresponding to physiology and pathology stiffness of liver tissues.
    Results: With the aid of RNA-Seq technology, our study characterizes the transcriptome of hepatocytes cultured on soft, moderate, stiff and plastic substrates. Compared to soft substrate, our RNA-Seq results revealed 1131 genes that were up-regulated and 2534 that were down-regulated on moderate substrate, 1370 genes that were up-regulated and 2677 down-regulated genes on stiff substrate. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that differentially expressed genes were associated with the regulation of actin… More >

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    ABSTRACT

    The Importance of Niches-Dimensionality in Regulating the Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Progenitor Cells Pool

    Pan Zhang1,2, Chen Zhang1,2, Jiyang Han1,2, Xiru Liu1,2, Qishan Wang3, Hui Yang1,2,4,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 132-132, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.06839
    Abstract Research in stem cell biology relies on the knowledge of the cell microenvironment in vivo, known as “stem cell niche”, where stem cells are nurtured by the niche signals. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are capable of continuously generating and maintaining the body’s full immune and hematopoietic systems. In adult, a pool of hematopoietic cells, including HSCs, primarily reside in the bone marrow (BM) niches that plays critical roles on cell fate. Niche supporting cells, cytokines, extracellular matrix proteins and other biochemical cues associated with HSCs behaviors (quiescence, self-renewal, proliferation, differentiation, mobilization, homing, and apoptosis) has been revealed in quantity. Recently… More >

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    ABSTRACT

    Mechano-Electric Feedback and Arrhythmogenic Current Generation in A Computational Model of Coupled Myocytes

    Viviane Timmermann1, Kevin Vincent2, Joakim Sundnes1, Andrew D. McCulloch2,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 133-133, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07311
    Abstract Heterogeneous mechanical dyskinesis has been implicated in arrhythmogenic phenotypes. Strain-induced perturbations to cardiomyocyte electrophysiology (EP) may trigger arrhythmias via a variety of mechano-electric feedback (MEF) mechanisms. While the role of stretch-activated ionic currents (SACs) has been investigated intensively using computational models, experimental studies have shown that mechanical strain can also trigger intra- and inter-cellular calcium waves. To investigate whether the inherent strain dependence of myofilament calcium affinity may promote arrhythmogenic intra- and inter-cellular calcium waves under conditions of pathologic mechanical heterogeneity, we coupled a mathematical model of excitation-contraction coupling (ECC) in rabbit ventricular myocytes to a model of myofilament activation… More >

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    ABSTRACT

    Recent Progress in Medical Biomaterials

    Qiqing Zhang1,2,3,*, Yuan Zhang4, Linzhao Wang4, Yongzhen Xing4
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 134-135, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07301
    Abstract Guided tissue regeneration (GTR) is a technique that selectively guides cells to attach and proliferate towards an injured site to achieve tissue regeneration through a physical barrier membrane. In this review, we presented a brief overview of the development of GTR technology and GTR materials. Nowadays, new technologies such as electrospinning, nanotechnology, controlled release technique, and 3D printing have been introduced into the study of GTR materials. Resorbable membrane as GTR materials are available as alternatives to conventional non-resorbable membranes. Current GTR materials not only act as a physical barrier membrane but also as a scaffold to play a role… More >

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    ABSTRACT

    Mechano Growth Factor (MGF) Expression and Response to Multiple-Mechanical Stimulation after Biodegradable Stent Implantation

    Shuang Ge1, Ruolin Du1, Yuhua Huang1, Guixue Wang1, Yazhou Wang1, Tieying Yin1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 136-137, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07317
    Abstract Stent implantation is the most effective method in the treatment of cardiovascular disease which always destroy the integrity of the vascular endothelium and the local mechanical environment at the stent segment was changed, especially the biodegradable stents [1]. In this study, 3D printed biodegradable poly (L-lactic acid) stents were implanted into SD rat abdominal aorta and the endothelialization, intimal hyperplasia, and MGF after stent implantation were studied. Besides, based on the MGF we explored the effects of mechanical stimulation on MGF express in vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, and also the effects of MGF with different concentrations on… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Expression of Endothelial Tight Junction Protein Occludin under Mechanical Factors after Stent Implantation

    Junyang Huang1, Shuang Ge1, Yang Wang1, Ruolin Du1, Yazhou Wang1, Tieying Yin1, Guixue Wang1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 138-139, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07305
    Abstract Tight junctions are the most apical intercellular junctions of the lateral membrane in endothelial cells, regulating the paracellular material and energy exchange and maintain plasma membrane polarity. Occludin protein is one of the important proteins involved in endothelial tight junctions, and also closely related to the occurrence of atherosclerosis. Therefore, the study of occludin is valuable [1]. With the implantation of coronary stents, the integrity of the vascular endothelium is damaged and the local mechanical environment at the stent segment was changed [2]. The present study tried to explore the impact of mechanical stimulation after stent implantation on the expression… More >

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    ABSTRACT

    Endothelial Tight Junction Protein ZO-1 Response to Multiple-Mechanical Stimulations After Stent Implamtation

    Yang Wang1, Shuang Ge1, Junyang Huang1, Ruolin Du1, Tieying Yin1, Guixue Wang1,*, Yazhou Wang1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 140-141, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07300
    Abstract Zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) is a peripheral membrane protein belongs to the family of zona occludens proteins and plays an important role as a scaffold protein which cross-links and anchors tight junction (TJ) strand proteins, within the lipid bilayer, to the actin cytoskeleton[1-2]. Stent implantation is the most effective method in the treatment of cardiovascular disease which always destroy junctions of endothelial cells, the functions of the tight junction were also affected. However, the role of ZO-1 before and after stent implantation has not been fully understood. In this study, the expression of ZO-1 were analyzed by qPCR, western blot and… More >

  • Open AccessOpen Access

    ABSTRACT

    Oscillatory Shear Stress Induces Endothelial Dysfunction through the Activation of P2Y12

    Jianxiong Xu1, Lu Wang1, Jinxuan Wang1, Juhui Qiu1,*, Guixue Wang1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 142-142, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07273
    Abstract Endothelial cell injured or dysfunction, which results lipid deposition and inflammation, is the key point to exacerbate the process of atherosclerosis [1, 2]. Meanwhile oscillatory shear stress is a key factor that results cell dysfunction in vascular disease [3, 4]. Previous research reported that P2Y12 plays a critical role in the development of atherosclerotic lesion through promoting smooth muscle cells migration [5]. As well P2Y12 stimulated the internalization and transendothelial transport of high density lipid. However, whether the P2Y12 induce atherosclerosis through endothelial cell remain elusive. In this study we firstly found P2Y12 were expressed in endothelial cells of atheroprone… More >

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    ABSTRACT

    A New Mass Effect Research Rat Model to Explore the Occuping Effect on Secondary Brain Injuries after ICH

    Yuhua Gong1, Shilei Hao1,*, Bochu Wang1,*
    Molecular & Cellular Biomechanics, Vol.16, Suppl.2, pp. 143-143, 2019, DOI:10.32604/mcb.2019.07095
    Abstract The mechanical response of brain tissue closely relates to cerebral blood flow and brain diseases. During intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH), a mass effect occurs during the initial bleeding. As the hematoma increases, the haematoma mass effect continues to squeeze the brain tissue mechanically, which can even lead to the formation of fatal cerebral hernia. However, fewer studies have focused on the brain damage mechanisms and treatment approaches associated with mass effects compared to the secondary brain injuries after ICH, which may be a result of the absence of acceptable animal models mimicking a mass effect. Thus, a thermo-sensitive poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM)… More >

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