Home / Journals / PHYTON / Vol.79, 2010
  • Open Access

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    Seed, germination and seedling characterization of Cologania broussonetii (Balb.) DC.

    Lovey1 RJ, P Perissé2, C V ieyra3, JC Coraglio3
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 5-10, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.005
    Abstract Cologania broussonetii (Balb.) DC. (Fabaceae) grows from the Bolivian eastern Andes to the north west of Argentina, Cordoba hills and San Luis Province. It is recognized as a native forage. The objectives of this study were to characterize the seed, the germination and the seedling of C. broussonetii. Seed structure was characterized through free hand sections and analyzed with optical and stereoscopic microscopy. The germination assay treatments were: (1) intact non-scarfied seeds at 25 °C constant, (2) scarified seeds at 25 °C constant, (3) intact non-scarified seeds at 20-30 °C alternating, and (4) scarified seeds at 20-30 °C alternating. Results… More >

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    Heterosis and combining ability of tropical maize populations

    De la Cruz-Lázaro E1, G Castañón-Najera2, NP Brito-Manzano1, A Gómez-Vázquez1, V Robledo-Torres3, AJ Lozano del Río3
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 11-17, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.011
    Abstract Estimation of genetic parameters using diallel crosses experiments aids to objective decision making in plant breeding programs. The objectives of this study were to estimate heterosis, the general combining ability (GCA) of eight tropical maize populations, and the specific combining ability (SCA) of 28 crosses. The populations evaluated were: population 21, 22, 23, 25, 32, 43, 49 and the commercial variety VS 536. The Griffing method 2 design was utilized to estimate GCA and SCA effects, on a complete randomized block design with two replications, at two planting dates. The diallel analysis showed significant differences (p≤0.01 and p≤0.05) among planting… More >

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    ARTICLE

    Seedling growth response of Seriphidium quettense to water stress and non-water stress conditions

    Ahmad1 S, S Gul2, AKK Achakzai2, M Islam1
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 19-23, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.019
    Abstract Seedling growth and development of Seriphidium quettense were examined under water stress (WS) and non-water stress (NWS) conditions. Seedlings were grown in pots to investigate their response to NWS conditions. Impact of WS on seedling growth was assessed in pre-existing plants grown under a semi-arid, natural environment. Seedling growth attributes were recorded on a monthly basis. Seedling growth exhibited a significant positive response under NWS conditions. Length of the main root axis at the first leaf emergence stage was 5.69 cm under NWS conditions; however, it was 4.8 cm in the natural environment (WS). At the end of the growing… More >

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    ARTICLE

    Plant regeneration of Mullein Nightshade (Solanum donianum Walp.) from leaf explants

    O’Connor-Sánchez1 A, AV Domínguez-May1, MA Keb-Llanes1, YJ Peña-Ramírez2, VA Herrera-Valencia1
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 25-29, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.025
    Abstract A reliable protocol for plant regeneration of Mullein Nightshade (Solanum donianum Walp.) was developed from in vitro leaf explants. They were cultured on Murashige and Skoog semisolid medium, supplemented with several combinations of zeatin riboside and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid for shoot regeneration. The formulation that originated most shoots per explant was 8.5 μM zeatin riboside in absence of 1-naphthalene acetic acid. Explants with shoots were transferred to Murashige and Skoog medium, with half the normal salt concentration and without plant growth regulators for elongation. Elongated shoots were individualized, and they rooted readily in half-strength Murashige and Skoog medium without plant growth… More >

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    ARTICLE

    Association between microsatellites and resistance to Mal de Río Cuarto in maize by discriminant analysis

    Bonamico1 NC, MG Balzarini2, AT Arroyo2, MA Ibañez1, DG Díaz3, JC Salerno3, MA Di Renzo1
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 31-38, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.031
    Abstract Resistance to Mal de Río Cuarto (MRC) disease in maize (Zea mays L.) is important in Argentina because the crop area involves a wide region where the disease is endemic. Molecular marker-assisted selection could be used as an additional selection tool to enhance precision of the genotype selection for resistance. It demands the identification of informative markers. Microsatellite (SSR) markers linked to gene(s) associated with resistance to MRC have been reported from previous QTL analyses. These analyses have been made on linkage maps derived from a relatively early mapping population. In advanced populations, where highly distinct genotypes are easily classified,… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Statistical models for evaluating the genotype-environment interaction in maize (Zea mays L.)

    Kandus1 M, D Almorza3, R Boggio Ronceros2, JC Salerno1
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 39-46, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.039
    Abstract Our objective was to determine the genotype-environment interaction (GxE) in a hybrid integrated by maize lines either carrying or not balanced lethal systems. Experiments were conducted in three locations over a period of two years considering each yearlocation combination as a different environment. Yield data were analysed using the Additive Main Effects and Multiplicative Interaction (AMMI) model and the Sites Regression Analysis (SREG). Results were represented by biplots. The AMMI analysis was the best model for determining the interaction. More >

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    ARTICLE

    Tillage systems and fertilization on yield of forage maize

    López Martínez JD, C Vázquez Vázquez, E Salazar Sosa, R Zúñiga Tarango, HI Trejo Escareño
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 47-54, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.047
    Abstract About 15% of the world surface is subjected to the effect of man activities. The main causes of land surface degradation are livestock production, deforestation and inadequate agricultural practices. In Mexico, little attention has been given to soil conservation as a non-renewable natural resource. This has been mainly degraded by excessive use of agricultural machinery. As a result, 64% of the national territory suffers some degree of deterioration. Comarca Lagunera, located between Coahuila and Durango states in Mexico, is the main milk production region. In this region, 900000 t of cow manure are produced annually. This amount of cow manure… More >

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    ARTICLE

    Defoliation frequency affects morphophysiological traits in the bunchgrass Poa ligularis

    Gittins1 C, CA Busso2, G Becker1, L Ghermandi3, G Siffredi1
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 55-68, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.055
    Abstract Poa ligularis is an important forage in Patagonian rangelands. Populations of this perennial bunchgrass have been severely affected by overgrazing. We propose that increased defoliation frequencies will decrease (1) aerial- and belowground dry matter production, (2) root survival, and (3) concentration and content of total non-structural crown + root carbohydrates, and (4) increase root mortality. Five defoliation frequencies (plus 1 control) were applied in a representative grassland of the Occidental District in Patagonia during two consecutive growing seasons. All four hypotheses were rejected. Aerial and belowground dry matter production increased from one to two or three defoliations. Root production and… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Comparative vegetative anatomy between halophytic Chloridoideae (Poaceae) with forage importance

    Pérez Cuadra V y V Cambi
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 69-76, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.069
    Abstract Pappophorum phillippianum and Trichloris crinita grow in areas where traditional forages cannot establish. They are not food resources for excellence, but have some nutritional value to domestic livestock. Leaves and stems collected in a natural halophytic field were treated using current techniques for describing their epidermic and anatomical characteristics. Blades of both species have papillose adaxial epidermis, and it is also the case for the abaxial epidermis in T. crinita. Silica bodies are double-axe shaped or cross shaped. Both species show foliar glandular and eglandular trichomes. Only T. crinita shows prickles. Anatomically, both species show groups of fibers in the… More >

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    ARTICLE

    Phytochemical and pharmacological studies on Mikania micrantha H.B.K. (Asteraceae)

    Pérez-Amador1 MC, V Muñoz Ocotero1, R Ibarra Balcazar1, F García Jiménez2
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 77-80, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.077
    Abstract Asteraceae is one of the largest families of Angiospermae, and contains the Mikania genus. Several species of this family contain polyacetylenic and thiophenic compounds which are used as taxonomic markers. Also, their phototoxic activity acts as plant defense mechanism. In this paper we report the absence of these compounds in Mikania micrantha. We also describe the composition of the volatile oil from the seeds and inflorescence in the species. Linalool and α-pinene were the main components of this M. micrantha’s essential oil. This study tested the ability of extracts of Mikania micrantha to inhibit the mouse ear inflammation in response… More >

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    ARTICLE

    Induced responses in the subtropical evergreen, broad-leaf tree Schima superba: Effects of simulated herbivory on leaf quality and subsequent insect attack during leaf expansion

    Liu ZG1,2, YL Cai1,2, K Li2,3
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 81-86, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.081
    Abstract Induced responses to herbivory are physical, nutritional, and allelochemical traits that change in plants following disturbances, and reduce the performance and/or preference of leaf tissues on herbivores. This study gave evidence to the induced defense theory through the simulated herbivory in Schima superba, one of common dominant trees in subtropical evergreen, broadleaf forests in southern China. Results showed that leaves damaged at the beginning of leaf expansion would develop into having a larger area, higher toughness and higher tannin concentrations, but a lower water content compared with control leaves. As a result, they experienced lower herbivory rates than controls. These… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Genetic variability in 22 sugarcane hybrid varieties (Saccharum spp. Hybrid)

    Alejandre Rosas1 JA, ME Galindo Tovar2, HE Lee Espinosa2, OG Alvarado Gómez3
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 87-94, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.087
    Abstract Development of new sugarcane varieties allows to increase sucrose production and faces challenges as new pests and diseases, and soil fertility losses. The objective of this study was to contribute to expand molecular tools in selecting useful progenitors for hybridization programs. With this purpose, 14 RAPDs primers were pre-screened, and four of them which produced clearly resolved, reproducible and polymorphic fragment patterns were selected for genetic analysis of 22 sugarcane variety hybrids. These were used in the Estación de Hibridación at Tapachula, Chiapas, as progenitors in genetic improvement programs. Genetic distance analysis showed three main clusters. The first cluster contained… More >

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    ARTICLE

    Variability in seedling vigor components of Lotus tenuis according to planting date and seeding density

    Ixtaina1 VY y MM Mujica1,2
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 95-100, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.095
    Abstract The slow initial growth of Lotus tenuis limits its use to improve the Flooding Pampas grasslands by mean of its intersowing. Research on the inter and intra-population variability of seedling vigor under changing environmental conditions, and the population x environment interaction, contribute to design sowing strategies and selection criteria. The objective of this study was to evaluate the inter and intra-population phenotypic variability, under different plant densities and planting dates. Variables measured included the number of stems (Nt), and the shoot dry weight (PSa) in L. tenuis seedlings. Crown stems and PSa were determined in 5 populations in a completely… More >

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    ARTICLE

    Apparent cross-talk of two signaling pathways that regulate Zea mays coleoptile growth

    Buentello Volante1 B, F Díaz de León-Sánchez1, F Rivera-Cabrera1, R Aguilar Caballero2, M Ponce-Valadez1, E Sánchez de Jiménez2, LJ Pérez-F lores1
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 101-108, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.101
    Abstract Auxin and insulin promote Zea mays embryo growth, induce S6 ribosomal protein (S6rp) phosphorylation, and promote specific protein synthesis. The objective of this research was to test a possible cross-talk between insulin and auxin transduction pathways in Z. mays coleoptiles, typical auxin target tissues. Auxin and insulin produced differential quantitative and qualitative stimulation of cytoplasmic and ribosomal protein phosphorylation, and specific patterns of de novo synthesized cytoplasmic proteins. In addition, insulin induced S6rp phosphorylation was strongly inhibited by rapamycin, indicating target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase participation; auxin-induced S6rp phosphorylation was insensitive to this inhibitor. Phosphatidic acid (PA), a second messenger… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Leaf angle and light interception in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Role of the petiole’s mechanical and anatomical properties

    Hernández LF
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 109-115, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.109
    Abstract The relationships between (1) leaf biomass and morphology (lamina area and petiole and lamina inclination), (2) petiole’s mechanical and structural properties, and (3) the vertical light gradient inside the crop’s canopy were studied in field grown sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants, maintained at optimum soil water and mineral levels. At flowering, incident photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) was measured at the top of the canopy and on individual leaves using a quantum sensor. The fraction of direct incident radiation which passed through the canopy reaching each individual leaf was then calculated. Individual petiole and lamina inclination angles (iaPetiole and iaLamin, respectively)… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Comparison of isozyme transformation in maize as a result of insertion of the chitinase gene

    Yan PM1, HF Zhang1, Q Wang1, XY Yan1, Y Sun2
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 117-121, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.117
    Abstract Isozymes of peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), esterase (EST) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were analyzed on transgenic maize (with external chitinase gene) and its parent by vertical polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). This study was made using shoots at the fourth leaf stage. Results showed that: POD and EST were detected in 6 bands. POD-2 and POD-3 were present at the bud and seedling stages. POD-1, POD-4, POD-5 and POD-6 were only present at the seedling stage. POD-6 expressed stronger in the transgenic maize with chitinase than in its parent. EST-2 was present only at the bud stage, and its expression in… More >

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    ARTICLE

    Analysis of methodologies for the study of composition and biochemical carbohydrate changes in harvest and postharvest onion bulbs

    Abrameto MA, CM Pozzo Ardizzi, MI Gil, LM Molina
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 123-132, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.123
    Abstract Costly investments in storage and transport of onion bulbs makes it increasingly important to identify cultivars with the best chance of long-term storage. This paper discusses our own and other researchers’ results and laboratory procedures on onion’s pungency, soluble solids, dry matter, respiration rate, carbohydrates and catabolism-related enzymes under different storage conditions. The variability in parameters such as carbohydrate composition, pungency, soluble solids and soluble uronic acid concentration in water is growth dependent, and defines the quality of onion bulbs at harvest time. During storage, these parameters can be modified by environmental conditions, presence of pathogens or termination of dormancy.… More >

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    ARTICLE

    Soil Metagenomics: new challenges and biotechnological opportunities

    Hernández-León R, I Velázquez-Sepúlveda, MC Orozco-Mosqueda, G Santoyo
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 133-139, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.133
    Abstract Soil is a complex system that includes a great number and diversity of microorganisms. Until recently, only a small percentage of the bioma was known and could be studied. Currently, it is possible to have a deeper knowledge of all that unknown genomic material with the development of new tools, like metagenomics. New molecules have been discovered with various biotechnological applications, and knowledge of the diverse microbiological interactions in several environments, some of them with extreme life conditions, is much higher. We analyze the most recent literature in the field of metagenomics in this study, especially that related with the… More >

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    The influence of controlled fires on a plant community in the south of the Caldenal, and its relationship with a regional state and transition model

    Tizón1 FR, DV Peláez1,2,3, OR Elía1,2
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 141-146, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.141
    Abstract Fire plays a fundamental role in the structure of vegetation communities in the Caldenal. However, this effect has decreased considerably since the introduction of domestic cattle, which reduces the amount of fine combustible material. Objectives of this study were (1) to analyze the diversity and composition of a typical vegetation community in the south of the Caldenal after exposure to different fire frequencies, and (2) to show the convenience of using controlled fire for reversing the processes of scrub formation to states with more diverse and productive grassland communities. Forty-five herbaceous and woody species were recorded. Treatment C (control) showed… More >

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    ARTICLE

    Assessment of protein quantification methods in Tetranychus urticae, as a potential tool for resistance detection to pesticides

    Cerna1 E, Y Ochoa2, R Mendoza1, MH Badii3, G Gallegos1, J Landeros1
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 147-152, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.147
    Abstract Protein assays were conducted on Tetranychus urticae Koch, as potential resistance detection tools to plaguicides. This is a phytophagous mite that feeds on a large variety of plants. Experiments were carried out using a pesticide susceptible and three field crop strains of T. urticae. Protein was measured by colorimetric assays, using Kit-II from Bio-Rad, with bovine serum albumin (BSA) as standard. Homogenates were prepared using 10, 30, 50, 100, 300, 500 and 800 mites, with 30 replicates each. Linearity was obtained for the standard curve of the different methods, and r2 values ranged from 0.877 to 0.985. The Bradford method… More >

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    Cuticle and cuticular wax development in the sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) pericarp grown at the field under a moderate water deficit

    Franchini1 MC, LF Hernández2, LI Lindström3
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 153-161, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.153
    Abstract Wax in the sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) pericarp is an important morphological feature that interferes with oil quality and varies with crop management and environmental conditions. We studied the effect of a moderate water deficit (MWD) generated from early to late anthesis on quantitative development of the cuticle, and qualitative and quantitative development of the cuticular waxes (CW) of the pericarp in two hybrids grown under field conditions. The experiment was repeated during two consecutive seasons (Exp-I and Exp-II). At harvest maturity (HM), plants grown under a MWD showed higher CW content (31 to 47%) and thicker cuticles (13%) in… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Cloning and expression analysis of rubredoxin from cold-treated banana leaves

    Feng1 RJ, LF Lu2, KH Yuan3, P Cheng3, LL Zhang3, JF Qi3, Y Ren4, XL Xu5, XB Zhang3, LY Zhou3, YD Zhang3
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 163-168, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.163
    Abstract A banana (Musa AAA, Cavendish subgroup cv. Brazil) cDNA encoding a putative rubredoxin-like protein (MaRd1) was obtained from total RNA isolated from cold-treated banana leaves using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique. MaRd1 cDNA contained 597 nucleotides encoding 198 amino acids in the open reading frame. MaRd1 protein showed 56% amino acid identity with that of Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin (P24297). A chloroplast transit peptide and a transmembrane region were detected at the N-terminus and the C-terminus, respectively, of the deduced amino acid sequence of MaRd1 gene. Southern blotting revealed the occurrence of at least two copies of MaRd1 in… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Vegetation response to a controlled fire in the Phytogeographical Province of the Monte, Argentina

    Peláez1 DV, HD Giorgetti2, OA Montenegro2, OR Elia3, GD Rodríguez2, RM Bóo1,*, MD Mayor4,*,*, CA Busso3
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 169-176, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.169
    Abstract Fire is a major ecological process within most terrestrial ecosystems. Therefore, understanding the vegetation response to fire is essential to its management. Our objective was to study the effect of a controlled fire, conducted at the end of summer season, on cover and density of the most common woody and herbaceous species in Phytogeographical Province of the Monte, Argentina. In general, after the control fire, the woody species mean percentage cover was significantly lower (p<0.05) in the fire treatment than in the control (no controlled fire). This effect was persistent during the study period. No significant differences (p>0.05) were detected… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    An efficient protocol for culturing meristems of sorghum hybrids

    Sadia1,3 B, PC Josekutty2, SD Potlakayala2, P Patel2, S Goldman3, SV Rudrabhatla2
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 177-181, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.177
    Abstract A robust protocol for culturing meristems of Sorghum is required to assist with rapid genetic improvement of the genus. Through meristem culture, an efficient method for rapid micropropagation was developed for Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench. hybrids, namely NC+262, NC+6C21 and NC+6B50. Complete plants were regenerated directly from shoot meristems without an intervening callus phase. Regeneration frequencies varied between the studied genotypes and according to the growth regulator combinations present in the medium. The combination of BAP and TDZ showed a synergistic effect on shoot multiplication. The highest number of shoots per meristem (68 ± 2) was recorded for the genotype… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Relationship between leaf greenness index and leaf water status in wheat under different tillage systems

    Mirassón1 HR, ML Faraldo1, MN Fioretti2, M Miravalles2, RE Brevedan2
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 183-187, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.183
    Abstract Tillage system is an important management decision that has to be taken in the central, semiarid, temperate region of Argentina for dryland wheat production. A 2-year study was conducted on an Entic Haplustoll soil with a sandy loam texture to determine the effects of three tillage systems (conventional, vertical and notillage) on leaf water status and chlorophyll content. Measurements were made at the Z65 growth stage with a SPAD-502; leaf water potential measurements were simultaneously taken. There was a positive relationship between leaf water potential and leaf greenness in both years. Tillage systems were significantly different in 2007; both variables… More >

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    ARTICLE

    Wild vegetable use by Vhavenda in the Venda region of Limpopo Province, South Africa

    Maanda MQ, RB Bhat
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 189-194, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.189
    Abstract We studied the marginal utilization of 40 wild vegetable species in the Venda area of Limpopo Province (South Africa). Use of these vegetables with various purposes by humans is indicated. More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Osmotic adjustment in Leymus cinereus cv. “Trailhead” under field conditions

    Torres1 YA, CA Busso1, OA Montenegro2, HD Giorgetti2, HD Rodríguez2, D Bentivegna3
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 195-198, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.195
    Abstract Osmotic adjustment has been recognized to be an important adaptive response to water stress in higher plants. Although Leymus cinereus cv. “Trailhead” is reputedly a very drought-tolerant rangeland plant, its ability to adjust osmotically in the field has not previously been reported. This study examined the occurrence or not of osmotic adjustment in field-grown plants of Leymus cinereus cv. “Trailhead” during late spring in an arid zone of Patagonia. Plants of this species had been established in the field three years before. With this purpose, leaf laminae of this species were collected and pressure-volume curves made. Results showed turgor maintenance… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Records of Sclerotinia minor infecting cultivated and invasive plants in the southern Pampas and northern Patagonia, Argentina, including comparative studies with Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    Kiehr M1, R Delhey1, J Lusto2, PJ Paoloni3
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 199-202, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.199
    Abstract A report is given on host plants, distribution, damage and importance of Sclerotinia minor in the southern Pampas and northern Patagonia regions (Argentina). Spontaneous infections were recorded on seven plant species. Sonchus oleraceus and Eruca vesicaria are new hosts for S. minor; Cichorium intybus and Zinnia elegans are new hosts for Argentina. This fungus causes important damage on Helianthus annuus and Lactuca sativa, and it occasionally affects C. intybus and Solanum lycopersicum. Comparative in vitro and in planta studies were carried out with S. minor and S. sclerotiorum isolates obtained from sunflower. More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    West Indian avocado: where did it originate?

    Galindo-Tovar1 ME, AM Arzate-Fernández2
    Phyton-International Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol.79, pp. 203-207, 2010, DOI:10.32604/phyton.2010.79.203
    Abstract Origin of West Indian avocado has been explained by current-day factors, such as abundance patterns; however, it is still unclear where it originated. Anyhow, there is a history behind the species that reflects, in one way or another, the present geographic distribution and species characteristics. We examined paleohistorical and paleoecological data to explore the West Indian avocado origin. Our results suggest that West Indian avocado originated by domestication and ecological adaptation in the Maya Lowland area; this is where this botanical variety of avocado has an ancient history. More >

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