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Neuroimmune Interactions at the Crossroads of Health and Disease

Submission Deadline: 30 April 2023 (closed)

Guest Editors


Dr. Vijay Kumar, Department of Interdisciplinary Oncology, Stanley S. Scott Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Louisiana State University Health Science Center (LSUHSC), New Orleans, LA, USA. vij_tox@yahoo.com, vkuma2@lsuhsc.edu


Prof. Giustino Varrassi, Paolo Procacci Foundation, Roma, Italy. giuvarr@gmail.com

Summary

The nervous and immune system are most complicated biological systems in the human body. However, immunology is the one of the least static branches of modern biology among others, and so researchers must always keep asking what’s next. From here, neuroimmunology originates. Fever is a well-known example of neuroimmune interaction, for example endogenous cytokines (humoral immune components), including TNF-α, IL-1α, and IL-6 act locally as well as in the brain to induce neurological symptoms of fever, including appetite loss, muscular pain or bodyache, behavioral changes, and other changes that need direct neuroimmune interaction. However, further advancements in sciences have indicated neuroimmune interactions are crucial to maintain tissue and organ homeostasis, effective immune response during diverse inflammatory diseases, varying form infections to cancers. Hence, this special issue is focused on this emerging area that has much to explore in terms of maintaining homeostasis and disease pathogenesis.

 

We welcome authors to submit original research, review, and perspective articles focusing on, but not limited to, new findings in the following areas:

1.Neuroimmune interactions necessary to maintain homeostasis

2.Any inflammatory (immune) and neurological changes due to infection, internal changes (hormones, metabolism, microbiota, cancer), etc

3.Neurodegeneration

4.Autoimmunity

5.Chronic pain

6.Other diseases affected by neuroimmune interaction


Keywords

Immunity, Inflammation, Pain, Cytokines, Neurotransmitters, Neurodegeneration, Gut-Microbiota, Cancer, Neurons, Microglia, Astrocytes

Published Papers


  • Open Access

    REVIEW

    Reservoir of human immunodeficiency virus in the brain: New insights into the role of T cells

    YINGDONG ZHANG, MING CHU, HONGZHOU LU
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.12, pp. 2591-2595, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.030331
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Neuroimmune Interactions at the Crossroads of Health and Disease)
    Abstract Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of the central nervous system (CNS) has attracted significant attention because it contributes to severe complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and seriously impairs the life quality of infected patients. In this review, we briefly describe the latent infection of HIV in CNS and focus on the role of the important immune cells, such as T cells, in the formation and maintenance of the HIV reservoir in CNS. This review explores the mechanisms by which T cells enter CNS and establish latent infection of HIV in the CNS. In conclusion, More >

    Graphic Abstract

    Reservoir of human immunodeficiency virus in the brain: New insights into the role of T cells

  • Open Access

    REVIEW

    Microglial TRPV1 in epilepsy: Is it druggable for new antiepileptic treatment?

    JIAO HU, JIALU MO, XIANGLIN CHENG
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.8, pp. 1689-1701, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.029409
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Neuroimmune Interactions at the Crossroads of Health and Disease)
    Abstract Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases worldwide with a high prevalence and unknown pathogenesis. Further, its control is challenging. It is generally accepted that an imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory properties of the central nervous system (CNS) leads to a large number of abnormally synchronized neuronal discharges in the brain. Transient receptor potential vanilloid protein type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel that contributes to the regulation of the nervous system and influences the excitability of the nervous system. This includes the release of neurotransmitters, action potential generation due to More >

  • Open Access

    REVIEW

    Ketone bodies and inflammation modulation: A mini-review on ketogenic diet’s potential mechanisms in mood disorders

    YAN ZHENG, SIHUI MA, KATSUHIKO SUZUKI, HISANORI KATO, HUIJUAN JIA
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.8, pp. 1897-1906, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.027632
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Neuroimmune Interactions at the Crossroads of Health and Disease)
    Abstract Mental disorders such as depression and anxiety inflict significant burdens on individuals and society. Commonly prescribed treatments often involve cognitive therapy and medications. However, for patients resistant to these conventional methods, alternative therapies like the Ketogenic Diet (KD) offer a promising avenue. KD and its key metabolite, β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), have been hypothesized to alleviate mental disorders through anti-inflammatory actions, a crucial pathway in the pathophysiology of depression. This mini-review examines 15 clinical trials exploring the influence of KD and BHB on inflammation and their potential roles in managing mental disorders. Both human and animal studies More >

  • Open Access

    REVIEW

    Role of necroptosis in spinal cord injury and its therapeutic implications

    JIAWEI FU, CHUNSHUAI WU, GUANHUA XU, JINLONG ZHANG, YIQIU LI, CHUNYAN JI, ZHIMING CUI
    BIOCELL, Vol.47, No.4, pp. 739-749, 2023, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2023.026881
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue: Neuroimmune Interactions at the Crossroads of Health and Disease)
    Abstract Spinal cord injury (SCI), a complex neurological disorder, triggers a series of devastating neuropathological events such as ischemia, oxidative stress, inflammatory events, neuronal apoptosis, and motor dysfunction. However, the classical necrosome, which consists of receptor-interacting protein (RIP)1, RIP3, and mixed-lineage kinase domain-like protein, is believed to control a novel type of programmed cell death called necroptosis, through tumour necrosis factor-alpha/tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 signalling or other stimuli. Several studies reported that necroptosis plays an important role in neural cell damage, release of intracellular pro-inflammatory factors, lysosomal dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Recent research indicates that More >

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