Special lssues
Table of Content

Tumor Microenvironment and Cytoskeletal Dynamics

Submission Deadline: 30 March 2022 (closed)

Guest Editors


Dr. Xiang Qin, School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, China. qinxiang@uestc.edu.cn

Summary

The tumor microenvironment plays a key role in malignant tumor progression. As a place where tumor cells survive, the tumor microenvironment contains not only biochemical but biophysical elements. Tumor cells can sense the extracellular microenvironment, which in turn affects the intracellular behaviors. Cytoskeleton is a structure highly involved in pathological process following a series of complex cellular-biological events called invasion–metastasis cascades. Therefore, the interplay between the extracellular and intracellular tumor microenvironment as well as its underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated.

 

This special issue aims to synthesize insights on biochemical and biophysical tumor microenvironment. We welcome submissions of original research articles, review papers, communications, perspectives, commentaries that cover the recent advances in all aspects of tumor microenvironment and cytoskeleton network.

 

Topic include but are not limited to the following:

 Biochemical and biophysical tumor microenvironment,

 Interplay between tumor cells and extracellular microenvironment,

 Intracellular signal transductions,

 Cytoskeletal dynamics,

 Nucleus deformation and repair,

 Tumor multidrug resistance



Keywords

Tumor microenvironment, Migration, Cytoskeleton, Drug resistance, Intracellular force

Published Papers


  • Open Access

    REVIEW

    Biomechanics of transendothelial migration by cancer cells

    CLAUDE VERDIER
    BIOCELL, Vol.46, No.11, pp. 2381-2386, 2022, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2022.021368
    (This article belongs to this Special Issue: Tumor Microenvironment and Cytoskeletal Dynamics)
    Abstract Cancer metastasis is still a major social issue with limited knowledge of the formation of tumors and their growth. In addition the formation of metastases is very difficult to understand, since it involves very complex physical mechanisms such as cellular interactions and cell rheology, which are flow-dependent. Previous studies investigated transendothelial migration using sophisticated techniques such as microfluidics, traction force microscopy (TFM) or Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), combined with physical modeling. Here we summarize recent results and suggest new ways to investigate the precise mechanisms used by cancer cells to undergo transendothelial migration. More >

  • Open Access

    VIEWPOINT

    Possible mechanisms of bidirectional nuclear transport during neuronal migration

    CHUYING ZHOU, MINEKO KENGAKU
    BIOCELL, Vol.46, No.11, pp. 2357-2361, 2022, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2022.021050
    (This article belongs to this Special Issue: Tumor Microenvironment and Cytoskeletal Dynamics)
    Abstract Neuronal migration is a fundamental process of mammalian brain development. In migrating neurons, the nuclear membrane protein Nesprin-2 has been shown to serve as an adaptor to pull the nucleus along microtubule tracks. Current evidence has shown that Nesprin-2 binds to both the minus-end-directed motor dynein as well as the plus-end-directed motor kinesin. However, translocation of neuronal nucleus has long been thought to be primarily driven by dynein motors. Intriguing questions could be raised about the role of kinesin in nuclear transport and how the activities of opposing motors are coordinated through interactions with Nesprin. Combining evidence from recent studies,… More >

  • Open Access

    VIEWPOINT

    Ready to migrate? Reading cellular signs of migration in an epithelial to mesenchymal transition model

    TAMARA FERNÁNDEZ-CALERO, IGNACIO LÓPEZ, MARCOS DAVYT, CORA CHALAR, RICARDO EHRLICH, MÓNICA MARÍN
    BIOCELL, Vol.46, No.11, pp. 2353-2356, 2022, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2022.020966
    (This article belongs to this Special Issue: Tumor Microenvironment and Cytoskeletal Dynamics)
    Abstract The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a cellular program that drives de-differentiation of cells in both physiological and pathological processes. One of the characteristics of cells describing an EMT is the (re)acquisition of a motility capacity that allows them to migrate through the original tissue as well as to other sites in the organism. The molecular mechanisms that control the EMT are rapidly emerging and here we add to the idea that the adaptation required for cells to commit to the EMT includes adjustments of the translation machinery and metabolic pathways to cope with a high demand of extracellular… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Role of PTX3 and complement modulation in the tumor microenvironment

    GIUSEPPE STEFANO NETTI, FEDERICA SPADACCINO, VALERIA CATALANO, GIUSEPPE CASTELLANO, GIOVANNI STALLONE, ELENA RANIERI
    BIOCELL, Vol.46, No.10, pp. 2235-2239, 2022, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2022.020209
    (This article belongs to this Special Issue: Tumor Microenvironment and Cytoskeletal Dynamics)
    Abstract Pentraxin-3 (PTX3), the prototype of long pentraxins, seems to influence complement system (CS) modulation. PTX3 and CS sustain carcinogenesis, enriching tumor microenvironment (TME) with pro-inflammatory molecules promoting angiogenesis in prostate cancer (PC) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Furthermore, cancer cells overexpress complement regulatory proteins, such as CD46, CD55 and CD59, which negatively affect complement pathways for support cancer cells survival. This viewpoint aims to elucidate the ambivalent role of PTX3 and the CS in the context of tumor microenvironment (TME). More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Comprehensive analysis reveals an arachidonic acid metabolism-related gene signature in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    HUILI ZHU, LINA XIAO, XIA YIN, SHIBING XIANG, CHUNHUI WANG
    BIOCELL, Vol.46, No.10, pp. 2241-2256, 2022, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2022.020389
    (This article belongs to this Special Issue: Tumor Microenvironment and Cytoskeletal Dynamics)
    Abstract Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is highly heterogeneous, making its prognosis prediction difficult. The arachidonic acid (AA) cascade is involved in carcinogenesis. Therefore, the metabolic enzymes of the AA cascade consist of lipoxygenases (LOXs), phospholipase A2s (PLA2s), and cyclooxygenases (COXs) along with their metabolic products, including leukotrienes. Nevertheless, the prognostic potential of AA metabolism-associated PDAC has not been explored. Herein, the mRNA expression patterns and the matching clinical information of individuals with PDAC were abstracted from online data resources. We employed the LASSO Cox regression model to develop a multigene clinical signature in the TCGA queue. The GEO queue and the… More >

  • Open Access

    VIEWPOINT

    The cellular microenvironment and cytoskeletal actin dynamics in liver fibrogenesis

    NOUR HIJAZI, DON C. ROCKEY, ZENGDUN SHI
    BIOCELL, Vol.46, No.9, pp. 2003-2007, 2022, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2022.020171
    (This article belongs to this Special Issue: Tumor Microenvironment and Cytoskeletal Dynamics)
    Abstract Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the primary effector cells in liver fibrosis. In the normal liver, HSCs serve as the primary vitamin A storage cells in the body and retain a “quiescent” phenotype. However, after liver injury, they transdifferentiate to an “activated” myofibroblast-like phenotype, which is associated with dramatic upregulation of smooth muscle specific actin and extracellular matrix proteins. The result is a fibrotic, stiff, and dysfunctional liver. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms that govern HSC function is essential for the development of anti-fibrotic medications. The actin cytoskeleton has emerged as a key component of the fibrogenic response in wound… More >

  • Open Access

    VIEWPOINT

    Expression analysis of OsSERK, OsLEC1 and OsWOX4 genes in rice (Oryza sativa L.) callus during somatic embryo development

    SITI NABILAH; TRI HANDOYO; KYUNG-MIN KIM; MOHAMMAD UBAIDILLAH
    BIOCELL, Vol.46, No.7, pp. 1633-1641, 2022, DOI: 10.32604/biocell.2022.019111
    (This article belongs to this Special Issue: Tumor Microenvironment and Cytoskeletal Dynamics)
    Abstract Somatic embryogenesis is an asexual reproduction process that occurs in many plant species, including rice. This process contains several totipotency markers such as Somatic Embryogenesis Receptor-like Kinase (SERK), Leafy Cotyledon1 (LEC1) and WUSCHEL-Related Homeobox4 (WOX4) and also a helpful model for embryo development and clones and transformations. Here, we report the gene expression during somatic embryo development correlates with regeneration frequency in 14 Javanica rice (pigmented and non-pigmented) using modifified N6 media supplemented with Kinetin (2.0 mg/L) and NAA (1.0 mg/L). Although there have been advances in understanding the genetic basis of somatic embryogenesis in other varieties, rice is still… More >

  • Open Access

    REVIEW

    Microenvironment promotes cytoskeleton remodeling and adaptive phenotypic transition

    MARIANO BIZZARRI, PAOLA PONTECORVI
    BIOCELL, Vol.46, No.6, pp. 1357-1362, 2022, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2022.018471
    (This article belongs to this Special Issue: Tumor Microenvironment and Cytoskeletal Dynamics)
    Abstract The cytoskeleton includes three main classes of networked filaments behaving as a coherent and complex structure that confers stability to cell shape while serving as sensor of internal/extracellular changes. Microenvironmental stimuli interfere with the non-linear dynamics that govern cytoskeleton architecture, namely by fostering symmetry breakings and transitions across different phenotypic states. Such process induces a wholecoherent adaptive response, involving the reprogramming of biochemical and gene-expression patterns. These characteristics are especially relevant during development, and in those conditions in which a deregulated crosstalk between cells and the stroma is at the core of the pathological process. Therefore, studying how the cytoskeleton… More >

  • Open Access

    ARTICLE

    Prognostic tumor microenvironment gene and the relationship with immune infiltration characteristics in metastatic breast cancer

    LU YANG, YUN LIU, BOKE ZHANG, MENGSI YU, FEN HUANG, YANG WEN, JIANGZHENG ZENG, YANDA LU, CHANGCHENG YANG
    BIOCELL, Vol.46, No.5, pp. 1215-1243, 2022, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2022.018221
    (This article belongs to this Special Issue: Tumor Microenvironment and Cytoskeletal Dynamics)
    Abstract The aim of this study was to reveal genes associated with breast cancer metastasis, to investigate their intrinsic relationship with immune cell infiltration in the tumor microenvironment, and to screen for prognostic biomarkers. Gene expression data of breast cancer patients and their metastases were downloaded from the GEO, TCGA database. R language package was used to screen for differentially expressed genes, enrichment analysis of genes, PPI network construction, and also to elucidate key genes for diagnostic and prognostic survival. Spearman’s r correlation was used to analyze the correlation between key genes and infiltrating immune cells. We screened 25 hub genes,… More >

  • Open Access

    VIEWPOINT

    ISG15 and ISGylation: Emergence in the cytoskeleton dynamic and tumor microenvironment

    ANGELES C. TECALCO-CRUZ
    BIOCELL, Vol.46, No.5, pp. 1209-1213, 2022, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2022.018136
    (This article belongs to this Special Issue: Tumor Microenvironment and Cytoskeletal Dynamics)
    Abstract Cytoskeletal remodeling affects the shape, adhesion, and motility of cells. Cytoskeletal dynamics are modulated by matrix proteins, integrins, and several cytokines in the tumor microenvironment. In this scenario, signaling is activated by integrins and interferons, which can induce ISG15 gene expression. This gene encodes a ubiquitin-like protein that functions as a protein modifier via the ISGylation system. Furthermore, non-conjugated ISG15 acts as a cytokine-like protein. In this viewpoint, the interplay between free ISG15, protein ISGylation, and cytoskeletal dynamics in the tumor microenvironment is discussed. More >

  • Open Access

    VIEWPOINT

    Cell extrusion in development and cancer, what MARCKS the difference for epithelial integrity?

    LUCÍA VELOZ, SANTIAGO A. BOSCH, GONZALO APARICIO, FLAVIO R. ZOLESSI
    BIOCELL, Vol.46, No.3, pp. 639-644, 2022, DOI:10.32604/biocell.2022.018798
    (This article belongs to this Special Issue: Tumor Microenvironment and Cytoskeletal Dynamics)
    Abstract Cell extrusion is an active mechanism to eliminate non-viable or supernumerary cells in healthy epithelia. It also plays a role in carcinogenesis, both in tumor growth (apical extrusion) and metastasis (basal extrusion). Embryonic tissues like the neuroepithelium, on the other hand, present rates of proliferation comparable to that of carcinomas, without the occurrence of cell extrusion. However, the downregulation or phosphorylation of actin-modulating proteins like MARCKS, causes extensive neuroepithelial apical cell extrusion. As changes in MARCKS proteins phosphorylation and expression have also been correlated to carcinogenesis, we propose here an integrated model for their functions in epithelial integrity. More >

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